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Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925 / Personal recollections and observations of General Nelson A. Miles embracing a brief view of the Civil War, or, From New England to the Golden Gate: and the story of his Indian campaigns, with comments on the exploration, development and progress of our great western empire
(1896)

Chapter XXXV. The Apache and the soldier,   pp. 445-449 PDF (2.2 MB)


Page 445


GENERAL NELSON A. MILES.
                          CHAPTER XXXV.
                    THE APACHE AND THE SOLDIER.
GENERAL CROOK AND His lxPEERIENCES - CiiARACTER OF TiIESE INDI ANS -ILLUSTRATIVE
IN'-
      STANCJE]S-  AVIDI)ENINESS ClT.llC1TERY - IO[,NTAIN FASTNESSES OF ARIZONA
            REiSOt E1CES OF T1E111 APACHE- IN AVAR -A FORMIER C AMPAIGiN.
        ENERAL CROOK       had been trying for years to bring the
          Apaches to termns, and on several occasions within thirty years
          they had pretended to surrender and had accepted the terms
          given them  by the government. They would then go back to
          their agencies with their plunder, stolen stock, and for a fresh
          supply of the munitions of war, and after remaining quiet for
   -~    soile time would suddenly break out again with renewed ferocity.
   There were various bands of Apaches  Yuma, Mohave, White Moun-
tain, Chiricahua and other branches. Tile Chiricahuas were the worst,
wildest and strongest of all. The Apache regarded hiniself as the first
mnan; the "superior man," as the word Apache indicates. In solle
re-
spects they really were superior. They excelled in strength. activity.
endurance, and also in cruelty. They were cruel to everything that came
within their power. If the young Apache could capture a bird or a
niouse or any living thing, he took the keenest delight in torturing it.
and this species of cruelty did not disappear even when they grew to be
stalwart men. They took pleasure in toriienting any living creature from
a bird to a horse. Their atrocities are simply too horrible and shocking
to
write out in words.
   There is an Indian by the name of Schimizene still living in that Ter-
ritory who, for a nurmber of years was in the habit of traveling pasta
certain white man's dwelling, and on these occasions was always treated
kindly, given food, and iiade comfortable whenever he cared to tarry
One morning after having stayed there long enough to secure a good
breakfast, he picked up his rifle and killed his benefactor, and then went
away boasting of what a strong heart he had. "Why," he renmarked,
"a,
weak mian or a coward could kill his enemy or any one who had done himi
an injury; but it takes a man of a strong heart to kill a friend or one who
has always treated him kindly." This is a specimen of Apache reasoning.
44.5


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