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Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925 / Personal recollections and observations of General Nelson A. Miles embracing a brief view of the Civil War, or, From New England to the Golden Gate : and the story of his Indian campaigns, with comments on the exploration, development and progress of our great western empire
(1896)

Chapter XIX. The Lame Deer expedition,   pp. 248-257 ff. PDF (4.2 MB)


Page 248


PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF
                           CHAPTER XIX.
                     THE LAME DEER EXPEDITION.
COMPOSITION OF THE C)MT\ANDI) - BEGINNING TIlE MARCI - W\EATIIHER - SHARP
INDIAN EYES -
  APPROACHING THlE CAMP - TIaE ATTACK - A CLOSE CALL - LOSSES - TIE RETUIR
N -
     MOUNTING THE INFANTRY-A CIRCUS WITH INDIAN HORSES -FOLLOWING THE RE1;-
         TREATING INDIANS - WINTER IN T1IE NORTHWEST - QUEER PECULI IRITIES
             OF INDIAN FEET - FINE SPECIMENS OF THE RACE - VISIT OF
                GENERAL SHIERMAN-REPORT OF GENERAL SHERIDAN.
      T the same time as we were making these dispositions of the
        surrendered, a command was being equipped to teach Lame
        Deer and his band that contrary to his opinion, the white men
   :;<2 could approach his village.
           After their people had surrendered and confidence had been
        restored, it was explained to White Bull, The Ice, Brave Wolf,
        Hump and others who had acted as hostages at the cantonment,
now Fort Keogh, that it was very important that the only hostile
camp left in the country should be brought in. They acquiesced fully,
and in fact seemed much incensed because Lame Deer had stayed out,
knowing that his depredations would be charged to their people who were
disposed to remain at peace. When the command was ready to move,
May 2, 1877, three of these men were taken along as guides, as they were
well acquainted with the habits and haunts of those who were still
hostile.
   Four troops of the Second Cavalry had been sent to report to me. With
this command, and two companies of the Fifth Infantry and four of the
Twenty-second Infantry, I started up Tongue River on the 5th of May, and
after a march of sixty-three miles from the Yellowstone I crossed the trail
of Lame Deer's camp where he had moved west toward the Rosebud about
the middle of April. Foreseeing that somne of their men would be watch-
ing our command, we passed on as if apparently not seeking their camp, or
noticing their trail. After a short march beyond the trail, the command
went into camp apparently for the night, on the Tongue River. Then after
dark, leaving our wagon-train with an escort of three infantry companies,
we marched directly west under cover of the darkness with the remainder
248


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