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Miles, Nelson Appleton, 1839-1925 / Personal recollections and observations of General Nelson A. Miles embracing a brief view of the Civil War, or, From New England to the Golden Gate: and the story of his Indian campaigns, with comments on the exploration, development and progress of our great western empire
(1896)

Chapter IV. Our acquired territory,   pp. 52-63 PDF (5.3 MB)


Page 52


PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF
                             CHAPTER IV.
                       OUR ACQUIRED TERRITORY.
COLONIZATION - RESULTS OF THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR-THE LOUISIANk PU1RCHASE..
   ACQUISITION OF TERRITORY FROM MEXICO - EXPLORATIONS OF LEWIS AND CLARK-
      FREMONT' S EXPLORATIONS - SUTR7EYS FOR TRANS-CONTINENTAL RAILW AYS
- RE-
         SULTS OF THE WAR IN ITS EFFECT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE WEST
            - CONSTRUCTION  OF TRANS-CONTINENTAL   RAILWAY - ]RAPID
               SETTLEMENT OF THE WEST - PITTSBURG - CHICAGO -
                  ST. LOUIS -EADS -FORT LEAVENWORTH- EmI-
                     GRANT TRAINS - HUNTING EXPEDITIONS
                        - THE DONIPIIAN EXPEDITION.
OON after our forefathers had planted their little colonies
  along the Atlantic Coast, their children ascended the Hudson,
  the Mohawk, the Susquehanna, the Potomac, and other valleys,
  penetrated to the Ohio, and at length invaded "the dark and
  bloody ground" of Kentucky, and slowly moved westward
  along the region of the Great Lakes.
     A little later they began to occupy the rich prairies of the
  Mississippi Valley, and to-day their remote descendants have.
transformed the treeless plains of the central West, and the mountain
valleys and gold-fields of the Pacific slope and of the Rocky Moun.
tains into busy and prosperous communities.  Long before the day of
the Anglo-Saxon occupation, adventurers of other races had passed lightly
over much of what is now the JUnited States. Yet only in a few iso-
lated spots had they left any enduring trace. Pressing closely upon the
footsteps of the hunters and trappers, the Daniel Boones of the frontier,
the
American has always founded homes, established schools, and organized
permanent industries.
   The favorable termination of the French and Indian wars, waged for
more than two generations, gave the English colonists the great lake-
region and northwestern territory west of the Alleghanies, and put an
end forever to the Frenchmnan's dream of empire in this quarter. The
Louisiana purchase gave us a vast area in the South and West, while the
Texas revolution and the war with Mexico, gave us New Mexico, Arizona,
and California.
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