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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, regarding European security, August 22, 1958,   p. 300 PDF (321.5 KB)


Page 300

300           DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 1944-59
ARTICLE 9
The present treaty is valid for a period of 10 years.
The treaty is subject to ratification in conformity with the legis-
lative powers of the signatory states of the treaty.
ARTICLE 1 0
The treaty is open for the adherence of all European states.
ARTICLE 11
The present treaty, the Russian, English, French and German
texts of which are authentic, will be submitted to the custody of the
Secretary General of the UN.
In witness thereof, the plenipotentiaries have signed the present
treaty and have affixed their seals thereto.
DRAWN UP IN THE CITY -                              1958.
Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry,
Regarding European Security, August 22, 19581
The United States Government has examined the Soviet Govern-
ment's note of July 15 and the draft Treaty attached to it. It does
not propose at present to comment on the substance of either. This is
not because it agrees with what is said or with the premise on which
the Soviet Government bases its arguments. The reason is simply
that the United States Government notes that the proposals embodied
in the draft Treaty are largely a reflection of proposals already in-
cluded in the Soviet Memorandum of May 5 about an agenda for a
meeting of Heads of Government, although surprisingly no mention is
made of such meeting in the Soviet note of July 15. The Western
powers have made their own suggestions for topics to be examined
by Heads of Government. They are prepared to express their views
about the Soviet proposals and to receive Soviet views about their own.
For this purpose, the Western powers suggested, as long ago as May 31,
a practical procedure for discussing the agenda which would be fair
to both parties. They still await a reply to this and also to their letter
of July 1. In the meantime, to their regret, the preparatory discus-
sions in Moscow are at a standstill. The United States Government
believes that the first thing to be done, before the proposals of either
party are discussed, is to resolve this question.
1 Department of State press release 490, August 23, 1958. The British and
French
Embassies delivered identical notes,


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