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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Reports of agents in Wisconsin,   pp. 157-160 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 157

REPORTS OF AGENTS IN WISCONSIN. 
157 
GREEN BAY AGENCY, Keshena, Wis., August 13, 1883. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit my first annual report, and I trust that
the fact 
that I have only had charge of this agency about three months will sufficiently
ex- 
plain its brevity. 
This agency embraces three reservations in Wisconsin-the Oneida, in Brown
County, the Stockbridge, in Shawano County, and the Menomonee, between Shawano
and Langlade Counties-and each reservation is occupied by the Indians for
which it 
is named. The number of Indians in each tribe, the quantity of land embraced
in 
each reserve, the character of the soil, and many other facts of a kindred
nature 
have been repeated by my predecessors, and I may safely pass upon them by
saying 
in these there is no particular change. 
The Stockbridges are moving on in about the same channel as of old, lumbering
to 
some extent in the winter season and cultivating small farms during the summer.
The Oneida Indians are in advance in civilization of any other tribe in this
agency, 
and more capable of sustaining themselves. The majority of the tribe are
anxious 
for an allotment of their lands in severalty, and some are desirous of becoming
citi- 
zens. Farming is the principal employment of the greater portion of the tribe,
while 
considerable wood is cut from dead and down timber and sold at the nearest
market. 
The AMenomonee Indians, as a tribe, are the least civilized. Many of the
Menomonees 
of the Pagan party clothe themselves entire in buckskin and subsist principally
upon 
the chase. In the winter of 1881 and 1882 the MNenomonees made their first
venture 
on their own account in lumbering, or cutting saw-logs from dead timber,
upon their 
reserve. The trial, accompanied with the good luck they met with in selling
the 
logs, made the venture a success financially; but this was followed by bad
results in 
other respects. The farm was entirely neglected and their fields became desolate,
and the money which they received for their logs, in most cases, was entirely
gone 
at the approach of a long winter again. Last winter they cut and banked about
six 
million feet of this same kind of timber, and although the prices offered
are low, they 
are such as to enable the operators to make a living and some profit for
their winter's 
work; and the Indians are anxious to embark in the same enterprise the coming
winter. In farming, the Menomonees have made very little advancement for
the past 
twenty years. The Menomonee tribal personal property, such as oxen, wagons,
&c., 
should be sold to individuals, as it is a noticeable fact that the cattle
and wagons 
belonging to individuals fare better than the tribal property of the same
kind. 
The agency farm is a failureof itself, as the cost of production of produce
and grain 
with Indian labor is more than its value, and it is only a favored half dozen
that it 
gives employment out of the mass; but the farm as an auxiliary to the boarding
school must be a success, as many of the wants of the school can be supplied
from 
the farm with the labor of the boys. 
The boarding-school house, the erection of which was begun in May last, is
being 
pushed forward to completion, with the expectation that it will be in readiness
for 
the winter school. 
Very respectfuly, 
D. P. ANDREWS, 
United States Indian Agent. 
The CoMMIssIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
LA POINTE AGENCY, 
Ashland, Wis., Augu1st 15, 1883. 
SIR: In accordance with Department instructions, I have the honor to submit
my 
third annual report of the condition of this agency. 
The Indians of this agency, known as the "1 Chippewas of Lake Superior,"
are 
located, under the treaties of 1854 and 1866, upon nine different reservations,
situated 
in the States of Wisconsin and Minnesota. The paymnents stipulated in the
treaty of 
1854 have expired, but a small distribution of annuity goods and supplies
is still con- 
tinued to the bands who were parties to that treaty. 
THE BOIS FORT OR VERMILLION LAKE BAND, 
who were parties to the treaty of 1866, still receive a payment amounting
to about 
$14,000 annually, $3,500 of which is made in money, and the remainder, according
to 
treaty stipulations, is invested for them in provisions, clothing, farming
implements, 
pay of employ6s, &c. Their reservations being located at Net Lake, Saint
Louis 
County, Minnesota, remote from any white settlements, and in a country abounding
in fish and game, they have subsisted principally upon the products of the
chase, and 
have made less progress in civilization than some of the other bands in the
agency. 
A 


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