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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Reports of agents in Dakota,   pp. 21-53 PDF (15.6 MB)


Page 21

REPORTS OF AGENTS IN DAKOTA. 
21 
SANITARY. 
There has been during the year but little sickness among the Indians of this
agency.. 
with the exception of small-pox, which raged to some extent. There were some
fif- 
teen Indians died with this disease. There have been twenty-four deaths and
seven 
births during the year. 
CIVILIZATION. 
To an unprejudiced mind there can be but one conclusion. While these Indians
live 
entirely in tents, tepes, and brush houses, and move from one part of the
reservation 
to another, they are fast adopting the customs of the whites in manner of
dress. I 
also consider their present location well adapted for their advancement in
this direc- 
tion. They are surrounded by white settlers, with whom they are constantly
thrown 
in contact, which has a good effect. 
INDIAN POLICE. 
The police at this agency consist of two officers and eighteen privates.
They are not 
as efficient as is desired. However, they are getting to beof some service
to the agent. 
On several occasions they have brought in horses belonging to white settlers
and 
turned them over, so that the owner could get his stock without trouble.
AGENCY BUILDINGS. 
The buildings at this agency are very poor; they consist of two old log buildings,
which are unsafe for the protection of supplies, &c., and are insufficient
for the ac- 
commodation and comfort of the agent and his employ6s. 
SUPPLIES. 
The supplies furnished this agency last year were not in quantity sufficient
for the& 
number of Indians who receive rations at this agency, and as the appropriation
for 
the present year is largely deficient from that of last, it is hard to tell
what the result 
will be. Owing to the fact that game is very scarce on the reservation, it
is natural 
to suppose that they will subsist on the sheep furnished them by the Government
aa, 
long as the same will last. 
I inclose herewith statistical report. 
Very respectfully, 
WARREN PATTEN, 
United States Indian Agent, 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
CHEYENNE ,RIVER AGENCY, DAKOTA, 
August 15, 1883. 
SIR: In compliance with instructions contained in circular from Indian Office
dated 
13th July, 1883, I have the honor to submit the following as my first annual
report 
of the condition of the Indian service at this agency relating to the Sioux
Indians, 
composed of the Blackfeet, Sans Arc, Minneconjou, and Two Kettle bands. 
1 I assumed charge of this agency on the 22d day of September, 1882, since
which time 1 
have endeavored to perform my duties in accordance with such instructions
as I have 
received. If I have failed in any of them, I trust such failure may be attributed
to 
my inexperience rather than to inattention to my duties. 
LOCATION. 
The agency is located on the west bank of the Missouri River, about 8 miles
below 
the mouth of the Big Cheyenne. The buildings stand upon about as unfertile
a piece 
of "gumbo" land as can be found along the river. Above us there
is much better 
land and better locations for agency buildings, and in my opinion they should
bt 
moved at as early a date as possible. 
The Indians of this agency are remarkably peaceable and quiet. There are
among 
them, as there are among any other people, bad characters ; but the proportion
is no 
greater, in fact I believe I am safe in saying that it is less, than in the
same number 
of whites. When I meet a bad Indian I treat him as such uitil he makes up
his mind 
that it is better and more profitable to be "Igood," and this he
generally acknowl- 
edges. I do not spe.ak egotistically when I say I think they have confidence
in me. 
It is very seldom necessary for me to repeat an order or a request. They
are not only 
willing but they seem anxious to obey all orders given them, especially such
as come 
direct from the "Great Father." As an instance I will relate the
following: In tha 
early part of June permission was given quite a number of the Indians to
go on a 
buffalo hunt (a number sufficient to attend to all their crops were to remain
at home.) 
-J 


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