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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1904, Part I
([1904])

Reports concerning Indians in Indian territory,   pp. 181-209 PDF (14.5 MB)


Page 181

REPORTS CONCERNING        INDIANS IN    INDIAN TERRITORY.        181 
a lasting benefit.to the Indians it has had, in many cases, just the opposite
result and 
in a short time, if continued, will be on a par with the old ration system
and just as 
harmful. It is self-evident that an Indian will put in a small patch of ground
just to 
secure permission to lease his surplus land for a term of years, then abandon
the 
planted field and idle away his time, depending entirely upon his rent money
for sub- 
sistence. This is practically the same in effect as the old system of annuities
and 
rations. The leasing system, in my opinion, should extend only to the old
and 
incapacitated and never to an able-bodied male unless he has at least 80
acres under 
cultivation. 
Industry.-As previously stated, this is a strictly agricultural country,
the Indians 
raising wheat for their principal crop and oats, barley, corn, and vegetables
as a side 
issue. The raising of cattle and swine should not be overlooked, however,
as some 
of our Indians have made a very creditable showing in this line. 
We have two sawmills located on Indian timber reserves. These mills saw into
lumber all logs hauled to them by the Indians. By so doing the allottees
are pro- 
vided with quantities of good building material to construct comfortable
homes. I 
large number have taken advantage of this opportunity, as the report of the
sawyer 
shows that 466,580 feet of lumber was manufactured at the mills during the
last fiscal 
year for the exclusive use of the Indians. 
Vital statistics.-It will be observed that the census accompanying this report
shows 
only 6 births and 18 deaths. The report, beyond question, is incorrect, but
the 
records give these figures and the space of time will not allow a verification
or dis- 
proval of the same. 
The sanitary condition of our school plant is not at all satisfactory. I
believe an 
attempt was made at one time to construct u system of drainage by small tiling
and 
open ditches. These, however, soon became clogged, and as a result we have
pools 
of stagnant water and filth standing under and near some of the buildings.
Some- 
thing must be done immediately to remedy this evil. 
Improvements and repairs.-Some substantial repairs have lately been made
to this 
plant by my predecessors, but many more are needed; the writer has already
sent 
in estimate for such. We should have a new and complete water and sewer system
at once. 
My incumbency has been of such short duration that I am unable to report
intelli- 
gently on the general efficiency of the employees or treatment by the Indian
office. 
Very respectfully, 
F. G. MATTOON, Superintendent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN INDIAN TERRITORY. 
REPORT    OF   SCHOOL    SUPERINTENDENT       IN  CHARGE    OF QUAPAW 
AGENCY. 
SENECA INDIAN TRAINING SCHOOL, 
QuAPAW AGENCY, IND. T., 
Wyandotte, Ind. T., August 24, 1904. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit the annual report on the Quapaw Agency and
the 
Seneca Indian School, Indian Territory, for the fiscal year 1904. 
Agency.-In the northeast corner of the Indian Territory are located seven
small 
tribes, or remnants of tribes, whose reservations comprise the Quapaw Agency.
These tribes are the Quapaw, Wyandot, Seneca, Eastern Shawnee, Ottawa, Confeder-
ated Peoria and Miami, and Modoc. The reservations of all these tribes cover
about 
212,000 acres. The agency has an Indian population of about 1,600 and white
pop- 
ulation of about 7,000. 
It is destined to become a county in the new State soon to be formed by a
union 
of Oklahoma and Indian Territories, and, as a county, will be one of the
richest in 
the State. Here are rich bottom lands, broad fertile prairies, five beautiful
clear- 
water streams of good size, besides numerous lesser streams, and a plentiful
supply 
of timber of all kinds. Here, also, minerals, zinc and lead, exist in paying
quanti- 
ties. The Quapaw Agency has been designated by act of Congress as the first
recording district of the Indian Territory, with the place of record at Miami.
All lands in this agency have been allotted in severalty to the members of
the vari- 
ous Indian tribes, excepting 535 acres in the Wyandot Reservation, 1,587
acres in the 
Ottawa Reserve, 160 acres in the Quapaw Reserve, and 24 acres in the Modoc
Reserve. 


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