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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1884
([1884])

Report of Carlisle school,   pp. 186-189 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page 186

186                  REPORT    OF CARLISLE      SCHOOL. 
INDIAN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, CARLISLE BARRACKS, 
September 12, 1884. 
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith my fifth annual report. 
The following table of statistics shows the population for the period of
report: 
Connected 
with school New pupils   Returned           Remained 
at date of  received.   to agencies.  Die d.  at school. 
last report.       Total.                            Total 
Boys.'Girls. Boys.'Girls.  Boys.'Girls. Boys. Girls, Boys. Girls. 
Apaches............    3   2    47   5   57         1................  6
   56 
Arapahoes...............-17  10  9  9   41    8              1   18   9 
  27 
Caddoes..............1..         ..1..............                1 
Cheyennes-................    ".........26.11 8 4...............10-10
      29 
Conanches............. ....102        11 1       1...............U11 
Cres.....................10  11-  ..21       8    91.........2       4  
  6 
Chippewas ............................8 -   1......l-....... .. ...     
7 
Crows.....                      5    6   19    3    2.......   1014 
Gros Ventres.........................1.................1 2 ...........1 ..::....
owas.............. 2            1...  1   7...   1  2 ..I ...... ...... 
Kaws...................-4  1........   ...      1                4      .
4 
Keeehies-..................1 ................1..... ........  ......... 
Iowas................ 3     2................5  1 
Kipans.....................1  1..... .    ........... ........   .  1   
 2... 
Menoans ...............  3.............:::  ..... 5 ..."...................
Memeies............  1I-- 1             . 3.  1....   ...   ...  ! 
Mioa s .................. 2  2 --...... .- ...... ..  1        1       .1
Navaos...................102  2 .. .....  4 ...    9  """....................0.2J]
 2 /  4,  2........... .. .  6 
iNe  r-c-..............-4  12    .    9- 2....   ............. ...   3  7
Northern Arapahoes ....  3   ............1...  3  2"' .".."
Omahas-...................20.            ...                  1   1 
Osages..................20, 14... .....  14  13  10..............   4   
1 
Otdaas................  2  2........-I      4 1 
Noaas..........1       2             2    4    4................... 
Pawnees4..................  4   10   9    31   2- 7............16 
Pones....................4 ............. 52......4  2...................
. 2 
Pueblos..................11  10  8 -  2  31     5    .. 7  1  . 10 
Pottawatomies ......  1................... 2  1" 1.......................
Sacs andFoxes............ . 1  t- .... 1 . 2.. ... ...... ...... .......
1 1.2 
Sioux,  osebud............23  1 " "271  21-  82  5.  10       2
  4..5....2..0. .. 
SiouxPineRide........  26  9          41    5 10 31 27..."   2    7
   61 
Sioux, Sisseto    n .....  3  3 .    ..   6 |3      3.....................
Seminoles....................2...... ..........    ....... .     ...... 
 2 
Shoshones ...    ..2...............      . 9.."17..... 0....... ..2
Towaconieses             1 .......................................... 
Wioin................4 ..............7      .  .............4    7     4
W inhaoes..................4..-- ......  2 .....  27 -----------2  2    
4 
T o ac u es. .. . .. .. . :- -- - ......3.. ....1 .. ... 
239  122  139  691  569  100  94   2    4        93  369 
PLANTING OUT. 
Of this number I placed out on farms and in families during the year, for
longer or 
shorter periods, 44 girls and 173 boys, and have arranged for keeping out
about 110 
the ensuing winter, to attend the public schools where they are located,
or to receive 
private instruction in the families. This is by far the most important feature
of our 
work, and, to my mind, points the way to a practical solution of the difficulties
and 
antagonisms separating our Indian from our other peoples, convincing both
races of 
the true character and capacity of the other. Of the 217 placed out last
year, 90 
were reported as excellent in conduct, 6:3 as good, 46 as fair, and only
18 as bad; 84 
are reported as exdellent workers, 83 as good, 41 as fair, and 9 as lazy.
I established a regulation that all who went out from the school should do
so in- 
tirely at the expense of their patrons, and should receive pay according
to their 
ability. The results have been most satisfactory. The absence from the school
has 
been in nearly every case a clear saving to the Government of their support
during 
such period of absence, and many of the boys and girls, besides supplying
themselves 
with clothing, have earned and saved considerable sums of money, which, I
find, has 
a most excellent influence. An Indian boy who has earned and saved $25 or
$50 is, 
in every way, more manly and iore to be relied upon than one who has nothing;
whereas, had he received the same sunm as a gratuity the reverse would be
the case. 
Necessarily we have to send out the most advanced and best students. Those
re- 
turned to their homes, added to the accessions made to the school during
the year, 


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