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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Report of agent in Wyoming,   pp. 313-314 PDF (778.1 KB)


Page 313

REPORT OF AGENT IN WYOMING.                                  313 
Aggregate of foregoing table-Continued. 
CLASS V.-VIOLENT DIS-       Sprains ------------------ 313 Punctured wound
.......   94 
EASES AND DEATHS.          Dislocation ..............  36 Poisoning ---------------
 57 
Frost-bite ...............  99 Other diseases of this 
Order 1.-WOUNDS. INJURIES,   Simple fracture (n ot           order .-.---...
         51 
AND ACCIDENTS.           gunshot) ---------------  77 
Compound fracture (not        Order 2.-HoMICIDE .....   11 
Burns and scalds --------  627  gunshot) .-..............  5 
Bruises ------------------ 534  Gunshot wound ---r----D 456 
Concussion of the brain..  4 Incised wound ----------- 215  Order 4.-ExECUTION
OF 
Drowning ---------------   3  Lacerated wound --------  167   SENTENCE ..............
 1 
GRAND TOTALS. 
Taken sick or wounded during year, males, 46,287; females, 38,541 ----------------------------
84, 828 
Remaining under treatment from  last year ....................................................
 1, 837 
Deaths, males over five years, 427; under five, 405 * -------------------------------------------
 832 
Deaths, females over five years, 205; under five, 246* * ..------------------------------------451
Recovered, males, 45,266; females, 37,726 -----------------------------------------------------
82, 992 
Remaining under treatment June 30 ----------------------------------------------------------2,
390 
Births, males, 932; females, 930 * ----------.-----------.....................................
 1, 862 
Births, Indians, 1,719; half-breeds, 115; whites, 28 --------------------------------------------
1, 862 
Vaccinated, successfully, 4,076; unsuccessfuliy, 1,906  .........................................
 5, 981 
SHOSHONE AGENCY, WYOMING TERRITORY, 
August 14, 1883. 
SIR: I have the honor to transmit my second annual report since resuming
charge 
of this agency. 
THE RESERVATION 
is situated in the northwestern part of Wyoming Territory, and embraces an
area of 
about thirty by fifty miles; is bounded on the south and west by the Wind
River 
Mountains, by Owl Creek Mountains on the north, and rolling hills and high
table- 
lands on the east. The reservation embraces about three-eighths rugged, rocky
mount- 
ains, partly wooded; three-eighths table-land and rolling hills, covered
with sage 
brush, too high for irrigation; one-eighth table-land susceptible of irrigation,
and 
one-eighth bottom land, mostly tillable. The two Wind Rivers and a number
of small 
streams flow through the reservation, and, uniting below, form the Big Horn
River. 
HISTORICAL. 
The Shoshones have occupied this country since 1781, and it was set apart
for their 
reservation by treaty made at Fort Bridger in 1868. By request of the Government
and consent of the Shoshones, the Northern Arapahoes were located here without
treaty 
rights. 
POPULATION. 
The Shoshones number at this time 778 on the agency and receiving Government
support, and 150 to 200 that are roaming and not counted; the Arapahoes,
952; mak- 
ing a total of 1,730 Indians on the reservation. 
VAGABOND INDIANS. 
The above mentioned nomadic Shoshones rendezvous at Fort Bridger, Evanston,
and 
intermediate stations on the Union Pacific Railroad, their object being to
get whisky 
and avoid labor, parading in rags and filth before the gaze of the traveling
public. 
They are a disgrace to the service, and should be compelled to live on the
reservation 
and be subject to discipline. 
CONDUCT OF INDIANS. 
The Indians occupying this reservation are quiet and peaceably disposed,
making 
but few complaints, although much abused by horse and cattle thieves, as
well as 
whisky sellers. Owing to shortage of supplies, especially beef, they have
to hunt a 
* This table shows only births and deaths reported by agency physicians.
For births and deaths as 
reported by agents, including agencies where there are no physicians, see
table, pages 266 to 284. 


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