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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1883
([1883])

Report of agent in Kansas,   pp. 92-94 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 92

92 
REPORT OF AGENT IN KANSAS. 
POTTAWATOMIE AND GREAT NEMAHA AGENCY, 
August 16, 1883. 
SIR: In accordance with instruction I herewiih submit my annual report of
affairs 
at the Consolidated Pottawatomie and Great Nemaha Agency, having under its
con- 
trol five separate tribes, the Pottawatomie, Kickapoo, Iowa, Sac and Fox
of Missouri, 
and Chippewa and Christian Indians. The population of the various tribes
as shown 
by last pay-rolls are as follows: 
Persons. 
Pottawatoinies.   .    .      .    .      .    .     .     ..-------------------------------------------------------410
Kickapoos.     .       .      .      .      .      ..-------------------------------------------------------
- - -   234 
lowas     --------------------------------------------------------------132
Sac and Fox, of Missouri -   --     --------------------------------------75
Chippewa and Christian or Munsee-.............................................71
In all. . --...------- .......---------------......................... 922
There are living on Pottawatomie Reserve, in addition to above number, about
fifty 
citizen Pottawatomie Indians, a part of whom are married into the tribe,
but do not 
draw annuities. They live on PottawatomieReserve by common consent of the
Prairie 
Band. There are about 280 Pottawatomie Indians living with the Winnebago
Indians 
in Wisconsin, who are members of the Pottawatomie tribe and would receive
tribal 
benefits, should they come here to live; they visit their friends here frequently.
POTTAWATOMIE INDIANS.- 
This tribe is the largest band in this agency ; they are located on a reserve
11 miles 
square, containing 77,357 acresin Jackson County, Kansas, 12 miles from the
Union 
Pacific Railroad. This reserve is mostly rolling upland with narrow fertile
valleys 
along the creeks and small streams. The upland is fine for grazing cattle,
and portions 
of it have proven by experience to be fine for tillable purposes. 
The statistics of these Indians show more advancement and improvements since
last 
report than any others in this agency except the Iowa tribe The industrious
and 
prosperous members are ver*, anxious to possess money and property, which
requires 
them to be energetic and active. They will realize one-half larger crops
than in previ- 
ous years. A number of these Indians are very good farmers and managers.
Under 
the diligent care of the superintendent of farming they have learned the
necessity of 
planting their crops early. The old custom was to wait in spring until their
ponies 
could get fat on grass, which is obviated by the use of corn. There are a
number of 
very aged Indians among them that never will or never could change their
mode or 
custom of living. They are, with the exception of a few, provided with comfortable
houses, which they are enlarging, remodeling, and repairiug all the time.
Act of Congress May 17, 1882, appropriated $8,000 for these Indians annually
from 
funds (interest on Pottawatomie general fund) for their support and civilization,
which was expended last year as follows: $5,000 paid per capita, $1,000 for
support 
of wheelwright, and $2,000 for purchasing agricultural implements and lumber.
KICKAPOO INDIANS. 
The Kickapoo Reservation is located in Brown County, Kansas, 5 miles north
of the 
Union Pacific (Central Branch) Railroad and 40 miles from Atchison City.
It is a 
fine body of land, interspersed with streams fringed with timber, with uplands
grad- 
ually sloping back, which are very fertile. Three-fourths of this reserve
can be util- 
ized for agricultural purposes. The remaining one-fourth is well watered
by springs, 
and is fine grazing land. 
These Indians have every advantage to become self-sustaining people. A majority
of this tribe are advancing in civilization, but as heretofore stated in
my reports there 
has been a faction among this tribe for three years, consisting of a leader
with follow- 
ers, who oppose any advancement towards civilization, and has used his power
in a 
way to be a detriment to the industrial school for that tribe. 
The agricultural results, as shown in accompanying statistics, are as satisfactory
as could be expected. They have done more fencing in the last twelve months
than 
in any previous year; they have comfortable houses, and there are several
fine bear- 
ing apple and peach orchards on the Kickapoo Reserve. 
A tract of this reserve laid aside for mill-site and missionary purposes
has lately 
been appraised for the purpose of selling to the highest bidder, the proceeds
to be 
used for the benefit of the Kickapoo tribe. 
IOWA AND SAC AND FOX OF MISSOURI INDIANS. 
The Great Nemaha Agency was consolidated with Pottawatomie October 1, 1882.
That agency is comprised of the lowas and the Sac and Fox of Missouri. They
are 
located in Kansas and Nebraska, on joining reserves, containing about 24,000
acres of 


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