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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1879
([1879])

Reports of agents in Idaho,   pp. 52-57 PDF (2.8 MB)


Page 52

52                  REPORTS OF AGENTS IN IDAHO 
The agency horses, ten in number, are not in good condition; they are old
and almost 
unserviceable, having been condemned by a board of survey, and their sale
ordered. I 
trust other and better horses will soon supply their place. 
SHEEP. 
From mismanagement, want of proper care and attention, quite a number died,
as 
I am imformed, from both starvation and disease. Their condition was such,
on my 
assuming charge, that a board of survey on them was deemed expedient. The
board 
recommended it advisable to sell the sheep, and in obedience to instructions
from your 
office, they were sold for the sum of $1,800, as also this spring's clip
of wool, 3,9141 
pounds, for the sum of $782.90. 
The agency buildings are all in good order and condition, excepting a row
of old ones 
on the bank of the river, which will soon be torn down, and such of the timbers
as are 
of account will be used in the erection of new warehouse and stables, which
you have 
authorized to be built. 
IRELIGIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL. 
There are two missions at this agency-Protestant Episcopal and Presbyterian;
the 
former under charge of Right Rev. Win. H. Hare, missionary bishop of Niobrara;
the 
latter under charge of Rev. John P. Williamson. Both missions are doing much
good 
toward the civilization of this tribe, with quite a number of accessions
to the church 
during the year. There are one boarding and seven day schools on the agency.
Num- 
ber of children attending one month or more, males, 115; females, 156. The
average 
attendance has been good, and quite a number of the children are learning
to read and 
write. 
In conclusion, I have only to add that this nation or tribe is now in a prosperous
and 
progressive condition, and much good may be expected of them in the near
future. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
ROBERT S. GARDNER, 
Special Indian Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
FORT HALL AGENCY, IDAHO, 
August 31, 1879. 
SiR: I have the honor to submit the following annual report of agency affairs
for the 
year ending this date. 
The present year has been one of peace and prosperity. I doubt if any community
of like number has been more quiet and orderly than the Indians at this agency.
Even 
the prisoners who were brought here last spring have shown a spirit of subordination
that is most remarkable. They have come to the wise conclusion that it is
far better 
to remain quietly at home than to go on the war-path, and that it is much
more 
healthy for them. 
NUMBER OF INDIANS. 
There are at present on the reservation 888 Shoshones, 331 Bannacks. It ie
esti- 
mated there are 142 Shoshones and 129 Bannacks absent; making a total present
and 
absent of 1,500 Indians belonging to the agency. By this showing there has
been a 
loss of 205 Indians since last annual report, which is accounted for as a
result of the 
Bannack war. 
EDUCATION. 
A day-school was opened onthe 20th of January, with 8 children present. This
num- 
ber was gradually increased until there were 22 scholars on the rolls, with
an average 
daily attendance of 17 during the five and a half months we had school. They
were at- 
tentive and made rapid progress. In addition to their regular school studies,
a garden 
was cul ivated by the boys, for their own benefit, under the direction of
the teacher. 
On the 30th of June it was deemed best to give the children a vacation of
two months, 
with which they were very much pleased, and expressed a desire to return
as soon as 
the school should be reopened. 
While a day-school is better than no school at all, it does not supply the
needed 


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