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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Tule River agency],   pp. 326-327 PDF (916.5 KB)


Page 326

326       REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER        OF INDIAN    AFFAIRS. 
FARMING. 
All the farming land has been cultivated, and that too in excellent condition.
The, 
yield has been over an average for this season; quite a sufficiency has been
raised for 
the subsistence of the Indians, consisting of wheat, potatoes, corn, onions,
tomatoes, 
melons, &c. The Indians have planted about fifty acres for themselves,
which con- 
tributes largely to their comfort and contentment, and we hope the quantity
of land 
cultivated by them next year will be much greater. 
Owing to the cold, dry spring, and the prevailing high winds in early summer,
our 
corn and buckwheat will be but light, yet we expect a sufficient quantity
for our own 
use. 
IMPROVEMENTS. 
'We have completed the school-house commenced by my predecessor, so as to
make- 
it suitable for school purposes. There has been about one hundred and thirty
acres of land grubbed and put in a state of cultivation; nearly one mile
of ditch- 
ing and draining, thereby reclaiming some valuable land, adding much to the
ap- 
pearance and healthfulness of the reserve. One carriage-house has been built,
one 
granary 72 'feet by 30 feet completed, a carpenter, lumber and blacksmith
shop 
combined commenced and frame erected; thirteen new Indian houses made of
lum- 
ber and shakes, one frame-house, and one log-house, making fifteen new houses
for 
the natives. A great deal of fencing has been relaid, a mile of new fence
made, new 
gates made, roads straightened, laid off, made, and repaired, &c., more
than we have 
space here to speak of in detail. Our store-house is removed to another and
more con- 
venient part of the reserve and refitted in good style. One new house built
for the 
clerk, 24 feet by 27 feet in length, with porch in front, one story and a
half high; ma- 
terial in part used from a house turned over to me by George J. Prising.
If we had 
lumber with which to build, much needed improvement could yet be made before
winter sets in. A hospital, a house for the agent, one for the miller, and
a turbine 
wheel for the grist mill, are very much needed at present. 
BOUNDARIES, LAND-IATTERS, ETC. 
I am pleased to inform you that the commissioners sent here to locate the
boundaries, 
of this reserve, and appraise the improvements of settlers residing north
of the town- 
ship-line in this valley, did their work to the entire satisfaction of every
person in- 
terested in the welfare of the reservation and Indians. When the settlers
are paid for 
their improvements, and the Government gets possession of the land embraced
in the 
new survey, we can reasonably expect greater prosperity than we have ever
yet 
reached. I most respectfully request the Commissioner to cause the settlers
to be paid 
at the earliest possible convenience, so that they can leave before winter
sets in, and 
we be not deprived of the benefits of the land and range another year. 
MISCELLANEOUS. 
The number of animals has been quite insufficient for the proper cultivation
of the- 
land this year cultivated, and [for] herding of stock; aud with the new territory
soon to 
be added we will need several good work-mules and riding-horses for our herdsmen.
We 
also need wagons, harness, and farming implements. I trust Congress will
make an 
appropriation sufficient to place the reservation in such condition that
we may accom- 
plish all the objects for which it has been established, and thus make it
a blessing 
to the Indians and an honor to the Government. 
J. L. BURCHARD, 
Indian Agent. 
Hon. E. P. SMrITI, 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington, D. C. 
77. 
TULE RIVER INDIAN AGENCY, 
California, September 10, 1873. 
Sin  I have the honor, in compliance with the requirements of the Indian
Depart- 
ment, to submit this my third annual report of the condition of the Indian
service at 
this agency. 
During the past year the Indians at this agency have been well disposed,
peaceable 
and a marked improvement in their moral and domestic relations it is gratifying
to 
note. The sanitary condition of the Indians during the past year has greatly
im- 
proved. 
At the date of my last annual report the number of Indians living at the
agency 
was 374; there has been no material change in the number then reported..
The 


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