University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Round Valley agency],   pp. 325-326 PDF (855.0 KB)


Page 325

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER       OF INDIAN     AFFAIRS.        325 
76. 
ROUND VALLEY RESERVATION, 
California, September 12, 1873. 
Sin: In compliance with the regulations of the Department, I have the honor
to 
submit this, my first annual report, as agent of the Round Valley (United
States) In- 
dian reservation. Assuming charge at this agency October 1,31872, owing to
the severe 
illness of my worthy predecessor, Hon. Hugh Gibson, and his absence from
the reser- 
vation for a number of months previous to my taking charge, together with
in- 
fluences referred to in his last annual report, I found things in much disorder.
How- 
ever, by adopting and enforcing rigid discipline for a time, and using firmness
in all 
my transactions, order was soon restored, and prosperity was at once manifest
in every 
department of the reservation. From a careful census taken, we had June 30,
1873, 
one thousand one hundred and twelve Indians who actually make this reserve
their 
home. 
Male.   Female.  Total. 
Potter Valley Indians-................................. 178    201      379
Pitt River Indians-....................................  32      46     
 78 
Red Wood Indians ..................................... 40        61     
101 
Uki Indians ..................                          96       114    
 210 
Wylackie Indians.....................................17           16    
  33 
Concow Indians.... ,-............69                               90    
 159 
Little Lake Indians4..............................                88    
 152 
496       616    1,112 
In addition to these there are two hundred or more who are more or less dependent
-on this reservation for protection, supplies, &c. I am pleased to be
able further to inform 
you that a considerable number, since the above census was taken, have voluntarily
come 
to the reserve, and continue coming. I am happy to report that the Indians
here are, 
on the whole, contented and happy, quiet, orderly, and easily governed. The
main- 
tenance of a military post here is a needless expense, and the abolishment
of Camp 
Wright would be a financial benefit to the Government. 
EDUCATIONAL. 
During the past year one school has been kept in operation all the time,
with eighty 
pupils enrolled, and an average daily attendance of fifty. This. number of
scholars 
being too great in justice to either pupils or teacher, and there being more
who ought 
and would attend school if they had an opportunity, by authority of B. C.
Whiting, 
then superintendent, I employed a second teacher, and since July 1st have
had 
two schools in operation. The advancement of the Indians in learning to read
and 
write has been much greater than even the friends of the Indians expected,
and to all 
a matter of profound gratification. 
RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTIONY ETC. 
We have Sabbath-school and religious services every Sabbath, in which, I
am pleased 
to say, the employes take an earnest, active interest. Miss Colburn, who
now teaches 
one school, and Miss Burnett, who is engaged to teach the other, after the
1st of October 
next, are women of established character, as experienced, earnest, Christian
workers 
in educational matters, and religious training. 
SANITARY STATE OF THE INDIANS. 
The health of the Indians has been much improved in general. First, because
more 
houses have been built, and they sheltered from the inclemency of the weather
during 
the severe storms of winter. Second, many of them have had bed-ticking issued
to 
them, and have been induced to sleep on bedsteads instead of the ground;
they are, 
therefore, less afflicted with colds, coughs, consumption, rheumatism, &c.;
and thirdly, 
I have abolished all the sweat-houses on the reservation. A hospital, however,
is needed 
more for their health and life than anything else in the sanitary department,
aside 
from that of physician. Without a hospital and steward the sick cannot be
properly 
cared for; medicine is not now and never will be regularly and properly taken
by the 
sick, and I sincerely hope that an appropriation for this purpose will soon
be made. 


Go up to Top of Page