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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Umatilla agency],   pp. 317-319 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 317

REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
317 
There is a very large drift or jam in the Chehalis River, on the reservation;
if not 
removed, in a-short time will ruin the reservation. It is now one mile in
length, and is 
increasing every year. Will cost $10,000 to $15,000 to remove. I close this
report 
hoping the Government will grant our little wants. There can be a school
built up on 
this reservation of 50 to 60 scholars if we had the necessary appropriation.
Respectfully, yours, 
-/             DAVID SIRES, 
Farmer in charge Chehalis reserration. 
The SUPERINTENDENT OF INDI.AN AFFAIRS, 
Washbigton Territory. 
71. 
UMATILLA INDIAN AGENCY, OREGON, 
September 4, 1873. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit this my third annual report as agent for
the Walla- 
Walla, Cayuse, and Umatilla tribes of Indians. 
These Indians, once powerful and warlike tribes, inhabiting a large scope
of country 
in Eastern Oregon and Washington, have now dwindled down to a comparatively
small 
reninant of their former strength. I have endeavored several times since
I took charge 
of this agency to get a correct census of them, but have as yet found it
impracticable, 
owing to the fact that, in accordance with their treaty-rights, there are
alwcys more 
or less of them absent from the reservation, in the mountains and at the
fisheries, 
hunting, digging roots, gathering berries, and fishing.  I will endeavor
again this 
winter, ,hen the snow in the mountains renders it impracticable for them
to leave, to 
make an actual count. The census taken nearly three years ago by my predecessor,
I 
believe to be as correct as it could be taken at that time, and which he
reports as fol- 
lows viz: 
Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. 
Walla-Wallas. ........      57         87     28     29     201 
Cayuses.                    95        140     57     42      334 
Umatillas ........          92        144     41     25      302 
Total ..      .     244       371    126      96     837 
Homli, chief. 
Howlish Wampo, chief. 
Wenap Snoot, chief. 
This numbey. I think, is now too high. One great difficulty in enumerating
these 
people exists in the fiact that a portion of the Indians belonging to these
tribes still 
remain on the Columbia River, and some of these occasionally come on the
reservation 
and profess to have come to remain; they will stay a short time and then
leave again 
for the Columbia. 
During the past year considerable improvements have been made by the Indians;
better fences have been built, and some new farms opened, though much more
improve- 
ment would have been made if we had an adequate supply of lumber. As it is,
the 
saw-mill erected by one of my predecessors is at such a distance from timber
as to be 
almost useless. I called attention to this in my last annual report, and
in that report 
asked that permission be given to me to remove the mill to a point farther
up the 
river, nearer the timber. And I also asked that an appropriation of $1,000
be made for 
that purpose. I beg leave, respectfully, to again call your attention to
the matter. Logs 
have now to be hauled a distance of from ten to twelve miles over a mountain-road,
and as there is no team at the agency belonging to the department with which
to haul 
logs, and I had no funds whatever to purchase any, I have furnished my own
team of 
oxen to hnul what logs have been hauled during the past year, and by this
means I 
have been enabled to get a small amount of lumber. This I have done without
mak- 
ing any charge to the Government. Had I not done this I would not have had
any 
lumber at all, even enough to make a coffin to give a decent burial to any
of these poor 
people who died during the year. 
I stated above that I had no funds whatever to purchase teams. Of the appropria-
tion of $4,000 per annum for beneficial objects not one single dollar of
that fund has 
been turned over to me since September, 1871; and of the appropriation for
incidental 
expenses of $40,000 per annum for the Indian service in this State, only
$200 of that 
appropriation has been turned over to me during the same period of two years.
I would also beg leave to call your attention to that portion of my last
annual re- 


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