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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Moqui Pueblo agency],   pp. 285-286 PDF (970.4 KB)


Page 285

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER        OF INDIAN    AFFAIRS.        285 
The Chimehuevis and Yumas have not been regularly fed, as I consider it impolitic
to give anything to Indians who are not on reservations, except to prevent
absolute 
suffering. They have been accustomed to raise their own crops; and, as soon
as the 
irrigating canal is finishled, I shall remove them to the reservation, and
assign them 
sufficient ground for their support. 
The canal by which it is intended to irrigate this reservation has been pushed
for- 
ward since my last report. A tunnel has been cut for 430 feet through the
solid rock; 
another tunnel, of 3 0 feet, has been got under way, but no work has been
done since 
the commencement of the summer. on account of the rise in the river. The
water will, 
however, shortly fall, and work will be resumed, with a prospect of being
finished this 
winter. 
The Indians object to labor, except for money. They should rot, I think,
be in- 
dulged in their idle habits, and I desire to have a sufficient force stationed
on the re- 
serve to compel them to work for their own benefit without compensation,
save ra- 
tions. My opinion is that the Indian must be made self-sustaining before
he becomes 
susceptible to the influences of missionaries or teachers. 
The crops of all the river Indians will be much smaller than usual this year,
owing 
to the lateness of the river in rising, and the small overflow. 
The Hualpai Indians, at Camp Beales Springs, object to coming upon this reservation;
but they are now settled directly upon one of the principal lines of travel
; settlements 
and mining-camps are springing up all around them, and I agree with the Department
commander (General Crook) that the only way to avoid serious complications
with 
this tribe will be to remove them to this place, or to the Rio Verde reservation;
and of 
the two places I c6nsider this one preferable, for the reason that with the
Mojaves the 
Hualpais have always had kindred ties and intercourse, while with the Indians
on the 
Rio Verde reservation, Apache-Mojaves and Apaches, they have been more or
les hos- 
tile, and have lately fought against them as soldiers under General Crook.
I have re- 
quested the Department commander to furnish a sufficient force to coerce
them to 
move, and to remain with them for a time until they become thoroughly submissive.
I would desire to call the attention of thq Commissioner to the necessity
of increas- 
ing the salaries allowed employ6s P the compensation offered by the Department
is 
usually so much lower than that given by the other bureaus of the Government
in 
Arizona that it is very difficult to secure good employ6s. 
Good, reliable interpreters are also difficult to obtain, and I would suggest
the send- 
ing of one or two boys from each tribe to the Howard University, to be fitted
for posi- 
tions as interpreters and school-teachers ; absolute separation from their
parents and 
people is necessary to education and elevation. 
We had a school in operation for six months, but had to close it in April
last, on ac- 
count of the inadequate salary allowed the teacher. While it continued, such
chil- 
dren as attended made very good progress; but they were not many, as the
parents 
are prejudiced against learning, and, besides, exercise no control over their
children. 
Lately, when acting as superintendent of Indian affairs, I discontinued feeding
the 
Mojaves who live about Camp Mojave. This section of the tribe bave never
come 
upon the reservation. They number about 800, and I expect them during the
coming 
winter, as I hear their crops have failed. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
J. A. TORMER, 
United States .Endian Agent. 
The COATMISSIONER OF INDIAx AFFAIRS, Washington, D. C. 
57. 
M1OQUI PUEBLO INDIAN AGi-NcY, ARIZ. TER., 
December 30. 1873. 
SIR: I have the honor herewith to submit my first annual report, in compliance
with 
copy of circular of June 30, 1873. 
W. D. Crothers, my predecessor, and myself exchanged papers on the 9th of
July, 
he relieving me at the Sierra Amarilla agency, New Mexico, and I taking charge
of the 
Moqui Pueblo Indians of Arizona Territory. As soon thereafter as possible
I visited 
the Indians under my care, and met with more than an ordinary cordial reception
from 
them, owing to the fact that the night preceding the morning of my arrival,
and the 
night following, we had quite a good deal of rain, much needed by their growing
crops. 
They being an extremely superstitious people received it as a very propitious
omen. 
Their new Tata agent and the rain coming together they expressed it as evidence
of 
the Great Father's pleasure; that He had been angry with them for some time,
but 
now a brighter day was dawning for them. I found them very superstitious.
I have 
endeavored to disabuse them of their superstition, but find it is a part
of th~eir existence ; 


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