University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Cimarron agency],   pp. 279-280 PDF (896.2 KB)


Page 279

REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
279 
The building erected for this purpose should be of size sufficient to accommodate
from 
fifty to oue hundred pupils. Three young men should be selected from each
pueblo, prefer- 
ence being given to the most intelligent and provisions made for clothing
and boarding 
them at the expense of the Government. In connection with the school there
should be 
land enough for gardening purposesiu order that lessons might be giv'en in
this (to them) 
very essential branch of education, and also that the school might be made
in a meas- 
ure self-supporting. It would be advisable to connect with the institution
a carpenter 
or wheelwright and blacksmith shop, in order that such of their number as
might elect 
could receive instructions iu these branches of mechanics. Enough work would
be 
given by the different pueblos to make the shops self-supporting. In the
course of a 
year, or little more, members of the school would receive a good rudimentary
knowl- 
edge of English, and be competent to open school in their respective pueblos,
where 
they would make more rapid progress with the people than any English teacher,
and 
be employed at a much lower salary. 
To conduct such a school there would be required a principal, assistant,
(who should 
also be a practical farmer,) two practical mechanics. and a matron, the whole
under 
the immediate supervision of the agent. The establishment of this school
may be 
deemed too expensive, but a little careful consideration will correct such
an impres- 
sion. Schools are now sought to be established at the respective pueblos;
total number, 
nineteen. Should a teacher be sent each, the salaries alone would amount
to $11,400. 
For school-houses and repairs add $8,000; for school-books, fuel, &c.,
$2,500; total, 
$21,900; by no means a liberal estimate. The experimental school-building"and
lands 
would cost $10,000, salaries $5,500, incidentals, (provisions and all other
expenses,) 
$15,000, total, $30,500 ; a very liberal estimate. 
After a careful review of the efforts that have been made from time to time
to 
Christianize these Indians, I am convinced that the recommendation herewith
submit- 
ted will, if adopted, prove to be the most practicable and economical solution
of this 
difficulty. The maximum number of pupils could be maintained, and thus from
one to 
three young men, possessing an elementary knowledge of English language and
cus- 
toms, would be returned to each pueblo every year. The influence exerted
by them 
would be marked, indeed, and far greater than any resulting from missionary
labor in 
their midst. For the accomplishment of the recommendations set forth in this
report, 
I would respectfully ask that the following special appropriations be made:
Re-survey of Indian lands, the sum of ------..-. ..........................
8101 000 
Civilization of Indians, the sum of ----------------------------------------
25,000 
Agricultural implements, food and clothing, in cases of extreme necessity,
the 
sum of ------------------------------------------------     -      -----10,000
*   Total    ....................................................... 45,
000 
Believing that these simple and industrious Indians are entitled to much
considera- 
tion at the hands of a Government they have occasioned but slight trouble
and expense, 
I have submitted an estimate of their wants. The merely nominal sum required
for 
their education will be returned in revenue to the Government a thousand-fold
when 
they shall have become intelligent citizens. 
With the hope that the suggestions in this report will receive the careful
considera- 
tion of yourself and the honorable Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
EDWIN C. LEWIS, 
United States Indian Agent. 
L. EDWIN DUDLEY, Esq., 
Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Santa F, New Mexico. 
53. 
INDIAN AGENCY, CIMARRON, N. MEX., December 22, 1873. 
SIR: In compliance with your letter to Superintendent Dudley, dated December
4, 
1873, asking for the annual report from the agency, I have the honor to submit
the 
following: 
I assumed charge of the agency on the 1st day of August last, under appointment
from Superintendent Dudley. Most of my time since my appointment I have been
ab- 
sent on other duty, and for that reason I am unable to make as full and complete
a 
report as I would like to make. 
The employ6s at this agency are one interpreter, at a salary of $500 per
annum, and 
one commissary, at a compensation of $40 per month. 
INDIANS. 
There are under my charge one band of Utes, (the Muaches,) and two bands
of 
Jicarilla Apaches; I have no means of knowing their exact number, as they
have never 


Go up to Top of Page