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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[New Mexico superintendency],   pp. 263-270 PDF (4.2 MB)


Page 263

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER       OF INDIAN     AFFAIRS.       263 
ties during the past spring and early summer. Suffice it tp say that I should
not have 
tolerated anything of the sort near here. 
The sanitary condition of these Indians is not what it should be, nor, I
am satisfied, 
from conversations with members cf the Board of Commissioners, what the Department
desires it should be. I presume there is no remedy for this state of things
so long as 
this band refuse to avail themselves of the ample provision made at the agencies
on 
the reservation for their wants in the way of shelter, clothing, and medical
attendance; 
yet, for humanity's sake, I regret that the Government cannot stretch a point
and 
minister to all the needs of this inoffensive people, even though they be
"off the reser- 
vation." 
I have no further suggestions to offer in regard to the future management
of this 
"roving band of Utes;" but I trust that the peaceful relations
which have existed be- 
tween them and the whites for the past three years may continue while the
tribe 
exists. 
I desire to acknowledge the courtesy and attention of all the Department
officers 
during the past year, and am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
JAMES B. THOMPSON, 
United States Special Agent. 
The CO-MMISSIONER OF INDIN AFFAIRS, 
Washington, D. C. 
46. 
OrrICE SUPERINTENDENT OF LNDIAN AFFAIRS, 
Santa F6, N. Mex., Noteinber 15, 1873. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit my annual report, together with those of
the several 
agents connected with this superintendency. 
I assumed the duties of my position on the 14th of December, 1872, and since
that 
time have visited all the agencies, and, with two exceptions, all of them
at least twice. 
In every instance where there seemed to be the least probability of an outbreak
by the 
Indians, I have endeavored to reconcile them by visiting them in person,
hearing state- 
ments of their grievances, and where it lay in my power I have remedied any
mis- 
management of which they complained. 
So far as this superintendency is concerned, the friends of the'present Christian
and 
humanitarian policy have reason for congratulation. During the past year
but few 
serious deprdations have been committed by the Indians, and during the entire
year I 
lave learned of but two murders of white persons by savages. 
IYour attention is invited to the condition of affairs at the several agencies,
brief 
notices of which will be found in the following remarks: 
MESCALERO APACHES. 
This agency is located at Fort Stanton, about 200 miles southeast from this
place. 
The Indians are among the most wild and savage under my charge. For some
years 
they lived with the Comanches and participated in their depredations; but
they have 
been gradually collected about the agency, although the communication between
them 
and the Comanches seems to be only partially interrupted. 
When I became superintendent these Indians were very much excited about the
murder of their principal chief, Cadette, who was killed, it is supposed,
by Mexicans, 
against whom he had recently given evidence on a trial of them for selling
whisky to 
Indians. Fears were entertained by the settlers that they might break out
and devas- 
tate the surrounding country. Twelve. days after assuming charge of this
office, I 
started to visit them. I found that affairs at this agency required the presence
of some 
officer determined to protect the interests of the Government. The firm which
held 
the appointment of Indian traders, and acted as military traders, seemed
to have 
taken entire possession of Indian affairs at that place. The agentappeared
to have 
very little business except to approve vouchers made for him by these men.
The Gov- 
ernment had no buildings, and there were none in the neighborhood that could
be 
rented. The agent was, in consequence, compelled to accept such hospitalities
as they 
felt inclined to bestow on the Government and its officers. 
I remained at this agency several days, and held three councils with the
Indians, 
visited them in their ranchos, and saw much of the country they claimed as
theirs, 
and desired to have set apart as a reservation. The chiefs told me that this
country 
was their home, that they were anxious to have it set apart as a reservation,
and were 
not only willing but anxious to remain at peace. They were very desirous
that the 
murderers of their chief should be punished, but assured me that they would
refrain 
fromn taking the matter into their own hands. I promised that the murderers
should 
be dealt with by the law, if discovered, and asked them to advise the agent
if any 
new facts were ascertained. Up to the present nothing is known of the murderers.


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