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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Shoshone and Bannock agency],   pp. 244-245 PDF (923.1 KB)


Page 244

244       REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER        OF INDIAN    AFFAIRS. 
next ten years. Building material can be had within ten miles of the agency,
and good 
hay-land in about fifteen. 
They should be furnished with Ree corn, for seed, as early in the spring
as possible. 
This is best for the altitude, as it is hardy, productive, and is ready for
roasting-ears 
within six weeks after it is put in the ground. 
The disposition of these Indians and those of the north toward the whites
has 
changed much for the better within the past year. They show more feeling
of depend- 
ence, and more anxiety to be at peace; all of which they try to cover up
with a greater 
amount of bravado talk by the soldiers, while the chiefs say very little.
Those In- 
dians from the north that spent the winter here were quite well disposed,
and spoke 
well. They were not disposed to dictate or complain as those who had been
a long 
time at the agency. This marked improvement among all of these Sioux is greatly
owing to the generous course pursued by the Department in feeding them the
past 
winter. 
The northern Indians came to these agencies starving and enemies, and received
the 
same kind care that was given to those who had been here for years, though
the 
chiefs were loth to come to the agency. When they first came in thley sent
their 
soldiers to get rations that they might taste white man's food without his
knowing of 
it; but after a few issues they came to acknowledge their dependence. 
Those Indians that committed the depredations on this frontier the past year
were 
composed of Bad Face Sioux of the Ogallala band, numbering about forty lodges,
and 
have not been fed at this agency. The head-men of these outlaws are Crazy
Horse, 
Little Big Man, and Little Hawk. It is reported these have headed the war
parties 
that killed the whites. Red Cloud is called the chief of all the Bad Faces
by the In- 
dians, and most of his relatives belong to the outlaws. His son-in-law was
one of the 
principals in killing the two women in the Sweetwater country in July. 
For the good of the Indians, as well as the peace of the frontier, it is
important that 
these murderers be summarily dealt with. By educafion the Indian is incapable
of 
appreciating leniency, and to prevent a border war it requires more firmness
in their 
management. To do this the agent must have force to enforce his demands.
The Cheyenne and Arapahoes, for the first time since their treaty with the
Govern- 
ment, have all been at the agency the greater part of the year. They behaved
them- 
selves well and avoided all bad talk in their councils. These Indians are
anxious for an 
agency by themselves, which is considered advisable if selected on the reservation,
as 
their going south to join their people is impracticable, and they should
be away from 
the Sioux in drawing their rations. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
J. W. DANIELS, 
Acting United States Indian Agent. 
The COiMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
Washington, D. C. 
35. 
SHOSHONE AND BANNACK AGENCY, 
Wyoming Territory, September 17, 1S73. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following annual report relative to the
progress 
of the service at this agency. 
The Shoshone Indians have, since my last report, deliberately resolved in
council to 
settle down on their reservation and cease their migratory habits. The number
at 
that time on the reservation was 791 men, women, and children, numbering
126 lodges. 
Nearly all of the families wanted implements, seed, and land to commence
farming last 
spring. There was about 200 acres of land broke in a field of 320 acres,
all of which 
they plowed over with their ponies, assisted with the Government work-cattle,
and 
sowed with wheat, or planted with potatoes and garden-vegetables. Though
pretty 
well prepared for a small beginning, I had not anticipated so many new farmers
requiring more plows, harness, and other implements, than I was able to supply.
All 
worked, men and women, old and young, with great good humor and perseverance.
It has been necessary to employ-additional white men to assist in instructing
them, 
irrigating their crops, &c. 
Each family worked a piece of ground separately. It is believed they will
cultivate 
a large amount of land next year, and a new field of about 300 acres has
been fenced in 
this summer by the employ6s, and a frame building 20 X 40 feet is being erected
to 
store Indian grain and protect farming implements. The aggregate amount of
the 
crop raised by the Indians this year will bie from ten to twelve hundred
bushels of 
wheat, from two and a half to three thousand bushels of potatoes, and a considerable
amounit of carrots, beets, onions, and other vegetables for winter use. 


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