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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Upper Missouri agency],   p. 233 PDF (429.2 KB)


Page 233

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER       OF INDIAN     AFFAIRS.       233 
break up their hostile camp there, which would compel them to settle at their
respect- 
ive agencies. As it now is, a small party from the hostile camp can visit
any of the agen- 
cies and commit murder and theft and make their escape. The total number
of Indians 
belonging to this agency is estimated from seven to eight thousand souls.
Whatever 
success may have been accomplished with these people under my charge, is
in a great 
part due to Mr. Frederick W. Wright, head farmer, and the employ6s of the
agency. 
They have encountered hardships and privations, and have promptly responded
to 
every call of the service, and their energy and fidelity entitle them to
special commen- 
dation. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
H. W. BINGHAM, 
United States Indian Agent. 
Hon. EDWARD P. SMITH, 
Commissioner of Indian Affair8, Washington, D. C. 
30. 
UPPER MISSOURI Sioux AGENCY, 
Crow Creek, Dak., September, 1873. 
SIR: In compliance with the regulations of the Indian Department, I have
the honor 
to submit this, my annual report, as Indian agent, for the lower Bruld and
lower Yanc- 
tonai Sioux. 
The average number of Indians at the agency during the past year has been
3,000. 
The advancement of these Indians during this time has been quite perceptible
compared 
with that of former years. Three hundred and fifty acres have been cultivated
by them 
during the present season, and good crops realized. They have also erected
for them- 
selves, during the past six months, thirty substantial log houses, which
are the first 
ever erected by Indians upon this reservation. Many are now providing hay
for the 
cow and yoke of oxen promised to such as provide hay and shelter for the
same. 
The presence of one company of United States troops stationed at the sub-agency,
at 
lower Brt1,6, has done much toward preserving order, and throwing a restraint
over 
many young warriors, who otherwise might have chaused serious disturbance.
With the 
aid of the military the sale of intoxicating liquors to Indians has been
nearly suppressed. 
Sinee my last report two missions have been established at this agency, under
the 
auspices of the Protestant Episcopal Church; one at the agency-proper, in
charge of 
Rev. H. Burt, the other at the subagency, (Lower Brul6,) undir charge of
Rev. W. J. 
Cleveland. A day-school at each of these missions has been in successful
operation, 
with an average attendance of twenty each, the past year. At Lower Brul6
a substan- 
tial block warehouse, 22 by 80, and a carpenter-shop of like material. 22
by 48, have 
been constructed, while at the agency-proper warehouses and other buildings
have 
undergone repairs, 100 acres of new ground broken, and 700 rods of substantial
post- 
and-board fence erected. 
I would respectfully call the attention of the Department to the fact that
these 
Indians are now being subsisted in accordance with the 10th article of the
treaty con- 
cluded April 29, 1868, between the Government and different tribes of Sioux
Indians, 
and which expires with the close of the present fiscal year, at which time
these Indians 
will be thrown entirely upon their own resources so far as subsisting themselves
is 
concerned. This they are wholly incapable of doing at the present time, owing
to their 
limited experience in agricultural pursuits, and the scarcity of game. Without
farther 
aid they will probably make forays upon the settlers and farmers of the frontier
for the 
necessities of life, and which would soon lead to serious trouble. I would
therefore rec- 
ommend that such legislation be taken as would enable the department to continue
the rations of flour, beef, and bacon for the present, withholding that of
sugar, coffee 
and tobacco from all Indians, except the aged and infirm, and those who are
willing to 
render an equivalent to the Government. All of which is respectfully submitted.
Very truly, your obedient servant, 
HENRY F. LIVINGSTON, 
United States Indian Agent. 
Hon. EDW. P. SMITHr, 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 
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