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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Upper Arkansas agency],   pp. 220-223 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 220

220    REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
unfortunate in being divided-part at the Cheyenne and Arapahoe agency and
part 
at this. Being all one tribe and kindred, they should all be at one agency.
The situation and location of this agency are bad. The agency office and
commis- 
saries are on the military reservation, and one and three-fourths miles from
the shops, 
mill, and farm. Water has to be hauled from Bluff Creek, a distance of one
mile. It 
would be much pleasanter were all the affairs of the agency situated more
together. 
We are also in need of many conveniences and necessaries, such as a bakery
and 
hospital. 
Our boarding-school closed the last of Sixthmonth with a very satisfactory
examin- 
ation, commendable alike to teachers and scholars. 
Thomas C. Batty has not been very successful in keeping up a school organization
among the Kiowas, though much encouraged to believe he will get them to allow
a 
regular school this fall and winter. Though not permitted by circumstances
to teach 
their children in regular school during the summer, he has accomplished a
great deal 
of good among them, exerting an influence for good which is very perceptible
upon 
those with whom he is most intimately associated. Among the many difficulties
of the 
country on the frontier, as we are, the peddling of whisky by unprincipled
men is one 
of the greatest. Horse-stealing also causes us a great deal of trouble ;
being so near 
the Texas border, it affords an opportunity to quickly get beyond our jurisdiction.
Another great trouble we have to contend with is to get witnesses to go to
Fort Smith 
to appear in a case; the expense is several7dollars more than the fees; hence
many 
parties who, under ordinary circumstances, would give information by which
culprits 
might be apprehended and brought to justice, decline to do so for fear of
having to go 
to Fort Smith as a witnesi. By special police I have apprehended and arrested
some 
whisky parties, wasting upon the ground almost a barrel of very poor Texas
whiskey; 
have also recovered a number of Indian horses, and restored them to their
owners. 
Altogether I may say our prospects for the future are very encouraging, and
I firmly 
believe if good faith is kept with these people, that the day will come when
they will 
cease to be a burden to the Government, will become self-sustaining-with
the spear 
turned into the pruning-hook, the art of war no longer learned, and the sweet
name of 
Jesus spoken and loved by many, the elevating and redeeming influences of
civiliza- 
tion exert its power among them, their nomadic lives be changed to that of
the settled 
husbandman, with pleasant associations around. 
In closing this hastily-written and imperfect report, I desire to return
my sincere 
thanks to the superintendent and his chief clerk, Cyrus Beede, for the very
great 
assistance they have rendered me, in the trying times through which I have
had to 
pass. Neither would I be unmindful of the debt of gratitude I owe to Him,
who has 
kept me as in the hollow of His hand, guiding me by His Spirit, to whom be
everlast- 
ing praise. 
Respectfully, 
J. M. HAWORTH, 
United States Indian Agent, Kiowas and Comanches. 
ENOCH HOAG, 
Superintendent Indian Affairs, Lawrence, Kans. 
24. 
UPPER ARKANSAS AGENCY, INDIAN TERRITORY, 
Ninthmonth 1, 1873. 
RESPECTED FRIEND: In compliance with instructions and the regulations of
the 
Indian Department, I submit the following as my second annual report of the
Indians 
under my charge, to wit: 
CLEYENNES AND ARAPAHOES. 
It gives me much pleasure to state that, since the date of my last annual
report to the 
present time, the Cheyennes and Arapahoes have remained on what I have told
them is 
their reservation, as tribes, at peace with all men, both white and Indian,
and have 
preserved all their treaty promises with the Government, with two single
excep- 
tions, which will be noticed under appropriate head. 
I cannot, however, report as much progress in the ways of civilization, agriculture,
and farming as I was sanguine of doing at this time the preceding year, but
as much, 
perhaps, as I can reasonably expect, when the circumstances under which we
have 
labored are all known and understood. 
THE ARAPAHOES, 
as formerly, still rank first in adopting the ways, manners, and customs
of the white 
man, and have remained as a tribe peaceable and friendly, although some of
their 


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