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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Kaw agency],   pp. 201-202 PDF (918.5 KB)


Page 201

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER        OF INDIAN     AFFAIRS.        201 
WICHITAS AND AFFILIATED BANDS. 
I would again call attention to the great importance of these Indians, on
account of 
their influence upon the wild tribes. Their location is exceedingly favorable
for secir- 
ing their aid to the Government in its endeavors to prevent mischief on the
part of 
the Cheyennes, Kiowas, and Comanches. This proximity to the wild tribes has
some- 
times resulted in the loss of the crops raised by the Wichitas, but this
trouble is con- 
stantly diminishing, and I believe that a liberal policy, persistently pursued
toward 
its wards at this agency; will greatly promote the objects of the Government
in regard 
to the tribes in that vicinity. I therefore cordially recommend a continuance
of the 
aid hitherto furnished, and which has already yielded such desirable results.
Perina- 
nent security to their lauds has been repeatedly recommended, and should
be no longer 
postponed. 
KIOWAS, COM.ANCHES, AND APACHES. 
The interests of the Kiowas, Comanches, and Apaches have been managed under
very unfavorable circumstances. The Kiowas were assured last autumn by the
Gov- 
ernment that their imprisoned chief would be returned to thenm in the spring,
on con- 
dition that the tribe remained at peace on their reservation. The fulfillment
of these 
Conditions was acknowledged in Thirdmonth. and preliminary steps inaugurated
looking to a faithful execution of Government pledges. The excited condition
of the 
country, growing out of the massacre of General Canby by the Modocs, induced
post- 
ponement of further action in their case until the 4th of the present month,
when 
Satanta and Big Tree were returned to their tribe, and confidence measurably
restored. 
Although no raiding can be clearly charged against the Kiowas, andi much
less than 
that of any preceding year against the Comanches, and having the assurance
that the 
most influential men of both tribes are pledged to loyalty and peace, yet
it is neces- 
sary to employ several persons of proper qualification to remain in the camps
of said 
Indians to restrain their roving habits, and induce their consent to settlement
on per- 
manent homes. 
The iost prominent obstacle to the advancement of the Indians in general
civiliza- 
tion is the uncertainty of retaining their lands. The constant pressure of
the public 
press, inducing emigration into the Indian Territory, the persistency of
railroad inter- 
ests to procure the extinguishment of Indian titles in said lands, are very
discouraging 
to the Indians. Renewed efforts on the part of these migratory and corporate
interests 
will be made at the approaching session of Congress, and should' be as promptly
inet 
by the equitable and moral power of. the people. This territory is the onily
resting- 
place for the Ludians therein, and if opened for the ingress of citizens
it will result in 
the extermination of the Indians, and the inauguration of consequent evils
which can- 
not be countenanced by a Christian nation. 
Very respectfully, 
ENOCH 1-kOAG, 
Superintendent Indian Affairs. 
Hion. E. P. SI&ITY1, 
Cunnmissioner Indian Affairs, Washington, D. C. 
15. 
KAW INDIAN AGENCY  INDIAN TERRITORY, 
Ninthmonth 1, 1873. 
I submit herewith my fourth annual report for the Kansas agency. 
The prosecution of the work of appraising the lands belonging to this tribe
in the 
State of Kansas was pushed forward last fall to completion, and a report
submitted to 
the Indiani Departuient on the 28th of Twelfthmonth, 1872, which was accepted,
and, 
in accordance with the bill for the disposal of the lands, they were advertised
for sale 
the past spring, but for various reasons only a small portion was sold. Among
them 
the depressed state of the money market; also, the short time which the lands
were offered for sale did not admit of persons coming froni a distance, making
their 
selections, and getting their bids to Washington in time: and, by an order
of the hon- 
orable Secretary of the Interior, that appraisement has been set aside, and
a new one 
ordered. I regret very much that the Department believed this step necessary,
as it 
will defer the sale of the land another year, and, consequently, retard the
work of 
improvements on their new reservation. 
The school was kept up during last fall, winter, and spring, with a larger
average 
than any previous nine months since my connection with the tribe. The progress
of 
the children was all we could ask, and many of" them gave evidence by
their daily life 
that they had received a knowledge of the plan of salvation, and were living
up to it. 
The Indians had promised, on their removal, to .leave their children in school
in Kan- 


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