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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1873
([1873])

[Omaha agency],   pp. 191-193 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 191

REPORT    OF COMMISSIONER        OF INDIAN     AFFAIRS.         L1 
' The plan of issuing crackers, at the noon recess, to each scholar in attendance
at the 
schools, has been adopted with great satisfaction to the scholars. It was
previously 
the custom to issue weekly rations of flour, for regular attendance, to the
parents of 
the scholars. 
WISCONSIN WINNEBAGOES. 
As it seems to be the settled purpose of the Government to move the Wisconsin
Win- 
nebagoes, numbering 1,000, to this reservation, I would respectfully urge
the necessity, 
before such a step is taken, of providing more timber-land for them adjoining
the 
present reservation. The amount of timber owned by the tribe at present is
barely 
sufficient for the use of the Nebraska branch of the tribe until they plant
and raise 
timber on their farms; this they should be encouraged to do immediately,
by offering 
them premiums for successful tree-culture. 
MINNESOTA WINNEBAGOES. 
When the Winnebagos were removed from Minnesota in 1863, about 160 members
of the tribe, who were mostly half-breeds, remained; these have since, in
accordance 
with an act of Congress, been naturalized, and paid their proportion of the
trust-funds 
belonging to the tribe, amounting at that time, ag the Wisconsin Winnebagoes
were 
not considered a part 6f the tribe, to over $800 per head. The honorable
Secretary of 
the Interior has recently decided that the Wisconsin branch of the tribe
are entitled to 
and will hereafter receive their proportion of the interest on the Winnebago
trust- 
funds. 
Several of these naturalized Indians, who have disposed of all their money,
have 
since moved to this reservation, and no doubt look forward to being again
admitted 
into membership with the tribe. I have carefully avoided showing them favors,
and 
have, as far as possible, discouraged their remaining here. 
Very respectfully, thy son, 
HOWARD WHITE, 
United States Indian Agent. 
BARCLAY WHITE, 
Superintendent of Indian -Affairs, Omaha, Nebr. 
10. 
OMAHA AGENCY, NEBR., 
Eighthmonth 29, 1873. 
RESPECTED FRIEND: I herewith submit my fifth annual report of the affairs
of the 
Omaha Agency, as follows: 
Since my report last year an effort has been made to carry out the provisions
of the 
act of Congress for the sale of a portion of the Omaha reservation, amounting
in the 
aggregate to nearly 50,000 acres. Unfortunately, however, for the prosperity
of these 
Indians, only a small portion of the tract offered for sale was disposed
of, owing, it is 
presumed, to the minimum rate fixed by Congress ($2.50 per acre) being too
high to 
meet the views of those desiring to make investments. The want of success
in consum- 
mating this sale is more to be regretted on account of the discouraging tendency
it has 
upon the efforts of the Indians to subsist by agricultural pursuits. Many
who are dis- 
posed to be industrious among them have not the teams, plows, and aother
necessary 
appliances for prosperous farming; neither have they the means for purchasing
stock, 
which in this country is the most profitable branch of husbandry. 
As the sale of these surplus lands is the principal hope of securing means
for the per- 
manent improvement of the farms allotted to the Omahas in severalty, it seems
very 
desirable that additional legislation by Congress should be secured so as
to effect that 
object. 
Since it has been decided by the Indian Department to remove the Wisconsin
Winne- 
bagoes to the reservation adjoining that of the Omahas, a proposition has
been made by 
the special commissioner appointed to the duty of superintending the said
removal to 
purchase from the Omaha tribe, for the benefit of the Winnebagoes, now being
re- 
moved, a strip of laud two miles in width, lying along the south boundary
of 
the Winnebago reservation, and extending westward from the Missouri River
about 
ten miles, to where the Winnebago reserve widens out from four to eight miles
in 
width, embracing about 12000 acres. This proposition has been sanctioned
by the 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and tie price offered for the said tract
is at the-rate 
of $2.50 per acre. The substance of this proposition has been submitted to
the chiefs 
and head-men of the Omaha tribe, who are now out on the hunt, and a reply
through 
the sub-agent or care-taker sent out with them has been received to the effect
that 
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