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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1866
([1866])

Report of the commissioner of Indian affairs,   pp. [1]-61 PDF (28.5 MB)


Page [1]

REPORT 
OF THE 
C0313ISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, 
[Mr. COOLEY having resigned as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Hon. L. V.
BOGY suc- 
ceeded to the position November 1, 1866.] 
ABSTRACT OF RECOMMENDATIONS CONTAINED IN REPORT OF COMMIS- 
SIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Early attention needed to certain treaties pending in the Senate. 
Provisions should be made for treaty arrangements with remaining bands of
Santee Sioux 
in northeastern Dakota. 
Arrangements, by legislation or otherwise, for settlement of Wyandott difficulties.
Laws needed for punishment of crimes in the Indian country. 
Revision of system of trade and licenses. 
Appropriation of a fund for rescuing and restoring captives to their homes.
Appropriation of a fund for securing memorials of Indians. 
Revision of laws relating to depredations. 
Appropriation for surveys for allotments to Indians. 
Legislation to prevent taxation of Indian lands. 
Reorganization of clerical force of Indian Office. 
Reorganization of superintendencies and agencies. 
Increase of salaries of Commiiissioner and officers. 
/Special appropriations for education in several superintendencies. 
Provisions for a treaty with C ast Range Indians in Oregon. 
Increased appropriations in several superiutendencies, as Arizona, Nevada,
Utah, New 
Mexico, &c. 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
Ofice Indian Afairs, October 22, 1866. 
SiR : In presenting my second annual report, I follow the practice of pre-
vious years, of bringing to the attention of the department such topics con-
nected with the Indian service as are of general interest, before proceeding
to 
particulars relative to the various superintendencies and their subordinate
agen- 
cies. 
It may not be deemed improper to state at the outset that it would be very
agreeable, and that much labor could be saved, if it were possible, consistent
with a fair revume of the business of the-year, for these annual reports
to be 
abridged; but I have not been able to see how this can be done. it does not
seem a great task to attend to the business of directing the management of
about three hundred thousand Indians; but when it is considered that those
Indians are scattered over a continent, and divided into more than two hundred
tribes, in charge of fourteen superintendents and some seventy agents, whose
frequent reports and quarterly accounts axe to be examined and adjusted;
that 
no general rules can be adopted for the guidance of those officers, for the
reason 
that the people under their charge are so different in habits, customs, manners,
and organization, varying from the civilized and educated Cherokee and Choc-
taw to the miserable lizard-eaters of Arizona; and that this office is called
upon 


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