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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1904, Part I
([1904])

Report concerning Indians in Wyoming,   pp. 381-[386] PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 381

REPORT CONCERNING        INDIANS IN    WYOMING.           381 
The greatest difficulty encountered in the betterment of these Indians is
theii 
universal taste for intoxicants. Cases of liquor selling have been reported,
where 
convictions have followed, in the eastern district of Wisconsin. A number
of cases 
have also been reported to the western district, but so far the judge has
refused to 
bring them to trial for the reason that he holds the Indians to be citizens
and, con- 
sequently, entitled to all rights pertaining to such, including the free
use of liquor. 
These conflicting opinions make matters very disagreeable, and the condition
of affairs 
is simply deplorable, especially as relating to the marriage state among
the Indians. 
In general, they are otherwise law-abiding, the crimes committed being usually
the 
result of drunkenness. There were two cases of manslaughter during the year,
and 
each was committed when the parties were under the influence of liquor. 
Again, I wish to call attention to the state of affairs among the aged, sick,
and help- 
less Winnbagoes. While it is a mooted question as to these people being citizn,
it followg-that the State authorities will do nothing for them. During the
cold win- 
ters there is much suffering, and some have actually died from starvation.
I believe 
it would be a wise thing to discontinue the payment of annuities, with the
exception 
of giving-something for the support of the old and infirm Indians. The able-bodied
and healthy members of the tribe are well able to make their own living and
would 
be better off without their yearly annuities. 
Herewith inclosed are also statistics accompanying annual report. 
Very respectfully, 
AXEL J,'_COBSON, 
Superintendent and Special Disbursing Agent. 
The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
REPORT CONCERNING INDIANS IN WYOMING. 
REPORT OF AGENT FOR SHOSHONI AGENCY. 
SHosHoNI AGENCY, Wyo., August 15, 1904. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my second annual report of the affairs
at this agency. 
Buildingd.-The office buildings at this agency are in a very unsatisfactory
condi- 
tion, the same being the old adobe school building which was abandoned twelve
years ago. This and the carpenter shop and blacksmith shop should be replaced
with new buildings as soon as possible. The employees' quarters, while not
hand- 
some, are now fairly comfortable, having been pretty well repaired during
the year. 
Agriculture.-Much better conditions prevail along this line than did a year
ago. 
Nearly 100,000 pounds of hard white wheat was purchased for seed this spring,
in 
addition to seed oats and alfalfa seed, from funds to the credit of the Indians
from 
grazing leases. This has all been put in. and at this writing looks very
well. The 
increase in grain acreage over last year is about 70 per cent. Great difficulty
is 
experienced on account of lack of water; only a small per cent of the farms
are cov- 
ered with irrigation ditches, and water rights are lacking for a majority
of the ditches 
already constructed. 
Allotments.-The allotment work is progressing under the direction of Special
Allotting Agent H. G. Nickerson, and within a short time should be finally
coli- 
pleted. This will then permit the Indians to settle down permanently and
make 
improvements, which they would hardly feel like doing until they are reasonably
sure of a title. 
Education.-The progress in school work of a year ago has more than been main-
tained during the year just closed. By long and persistent effort every Indian
child 
of school age, of whatever degree of blood, was reported in school, except
those 
excused upon a certificate of physical disability from the agency physician.
I am 
informed that this is the first time in the history of this reservation that
such a con- 
dition has obtained. 
The Wind River Boarding School, located near this agency, under the superin-
tendency of Mr. William B. Dew, is doing the best work in all lines in its
history. 
Much has been done by all employees at this school during the school year
just 
passed to raise the standard of efficiency in all departments. Although immensely
handicapped by poor buildings and lack of room for the proper accommodation
of 
the pupils enrolled, the work for the year is very gratifying. The "esprit
du corps," 
almost totally lacking a year ago, is much in evidence at the present time
and 


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