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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, for the year 1904, Part I
([1904])

Reports concerning Indians in Kansas,   pp. 212-216 PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 212

212 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN KANSAS. 
REPORTS CONCERNING INDIANS IN KANSAS. 
REPORT OF SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT             IN CHARGE OF KICKAPOO, 
IOWA, AND SAUK AND FOX. 
KICKAPOO TRAINING SCHOOL, 
Horton, Kans., August 22, 190.. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my second annual report as superin-
tendent and special disbursing agent of the Kickapoo training school, Horton,
Kans., 
and superintendent in charge of the Sank and Fox and of the Great Nemaha
day 
schools. 
Kickapoo Agency.-Allotment.-In pursuance of act of February 28, 1899, and
an act 
of March 3, 1903, amending section 5, act of February 28, 1899, and in conformity
to 
the decision of the council held May 16, 1903, by the chief and headmen of
the 
Kickapoo Indians, in which they accepted the terms of the allotment, under
instruc- 
tions from your Office, the work of completing the allotment of all the surplus
land 
on this reservation was accomplished during the year. Assistant Allotting
Agent 
Coffland, assisted by Surveyor Marion and corps of assistants, reestablished
all cor- 
ners and again ran all the lines required by the allotment of 6,000 acres
of surplus 
land. Many of the cornerstones of the earlier survey were removed by the
Indians 
through prejudice or ignorance of the value of location. Surveyor Marion,
having 
made the previous survey, more readily accomplished the task than another
could 
have done. Some difficulty in making up the rolls for this allotment was
met with, 
owing to the fact that a part of the Kickapoo Indians known as the "Mexican
Kick- 
apoo" or "Kicking Kickapoo" left for old Mexico rather than
accept their allot- 
ments or allow their children to be allotted. This required a revision of
the forniter 
roll prepared by Inspector Beede. After carefully scrutinizing the roll as
revised 
the allotment was made and submitted to your Office for approval. 
Death of Ke wah ko uk.-During August of last year Ke wah ko uk, the last
of the 
prominent or recognized chiefs of the Kickapoo Indians, passed away at an
advanced 
age, and with him almost the last vestige of opposition to progress. While
he pos- 
sessed many of the virtues characteristic of the old Indian, he was very
stubborn in 
his opposition to all progress. 
Indian marriages, drunkenness, industry, and lease matters.-With the exception
of 
some seven or eight chronic offenders, the Kickapoo tribe of Indians in Kansas
repre- 
sent a fair standard of citizenship. These offenders in the past have been
in high 
standing among the Indians, but by vigorous prosecution of drunkenness, "boot-
legging," and gambling the reservation has been fairly well rid of vice,
and a much 
better public sentiment among members of the tribe has prevailed. The State
authorities have heartily cooperated with the superintendent in all his efforts
to 
bring about a better condition of affairs. 
Visiting officials.-During December Supervisor Chalcraft visited this agency
and 
met with nearly all the Indians of the Kickapoo tribe and talked with them
indi- 
vidually, and later collectively, about matters of interest to them. His
visit was 
productive of good results, and a decided change for the better was immediately
dis- 
cernible among some of the Indians who had become discontented over the rigid
enforcement of discipline, law, and order. Inspector Nesler called unofficially
and 
gave considerable encouragement by his advice on some perplexing matters.
Inhprited Indian land.-During the year over $30,000 worth of inherited land
has 
been disposed of by the Indians on this reservation. Owing to the earlier
lax mar- 
riage relation, it has often been difficult to determine who are the proper
heirs. 
Among the first sales many of the recipients of the proceeds frittered the
money 
away in drinking and gambling, but later a more encouraging use has been
made of 
the money. Several new houses have been erected and other good, substantial
improvements made from the proceeds of the sales. 
Roads.-The Kickapoo Reservation is very readily recognized by anyone passing
through the country because of the poor roads and want of bridges. A great
deal 
has been done to remedy that condition during the year by voluntary contributions
from the Indians. The lessees have also contributed in work to the betterment
of 
the reservation roads. The county judges have promised to build some very
much 
needed bridges on the reservation during the coming year. 
Leases.-Before the recent allotment to children the Indians on this reservation
had much more land than they could cultivate with profit to themselves. The
old 
and superannuated, the women, and young children have each 80 acres of land,
most of which is tillable. This necessitates a number of leases. The Indians
have 
been encouraged to devote the proceeds of the children's leases toward improving


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