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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook 1990
Year 1990, Volume 2 (1990)

West, Wanda J.
Indiana,   pp. [186]-197 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 187

4DIANA—1990  187THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF INDIANA 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the U.S. Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Geological
Survey, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, for collecting information
on all nonfuel minerals. 
By Wanda J. West1 
 Nonfuel mineral production in Indiana ~ during 1990 was valued at $431.8
million, slightly less than the record established in 1989 and the first
decline ~ in 8 years. Increases in total values for cement, peat, industrial
sand, and crushed and dimension stone sales were offset by declines reported
for clays, gem stones, gypsum, lime, and construction sand and gravel. Crushed
stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, the leading minerals
produced, accounted for 79 % of the total value. Nationally, Indiana ranked
25th in nonfuel mineral value, supplying about 1 % of the Nation's total.
Indiana produced more 
dimension stone than any other State, and it ranked second and fourth, respectively,
in masonry cement and peat sales. No metallic ores were mined in the State;
however, it was the leading producer of pig iron and raw steel and ranked
fourth in aluminum output. 
 The State's position as the Nation's leading steel producer was solidified
by several events, including completion of the $525 million I/N Tek cold
rolling mill at New Carlisle in March. Other noteworthy developments were
the first full year of operation at Nucor Corp. ' s new $270 million steel
minimill near Crawfordsville and major modernization programs at integrated
steel mills. 
TABLE 1 
Main segments of the construction industry, which are primary users of Indiana's
nonfuel minerals, experienced contrasting rates of activity during 1989.
A slowdown in new home construction caused the number of private and public
residential units authorized to fall to 25,002 in 1990, almost 6 % fewer
than in 
1989. The decline in demand for raw materials by the bomebuilding industry
was partially offset by a sharp increase in commercial and industrial construction,
particularly in eastern and central Indiana.2 According to the U.S. Department
of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, value of all nonresidential 
NONFUEL MINERAL PRODUCTION IN INDIANA1 
Mineral 
'  
1988 
1989 
1990 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
. 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
Cement: 
405 
2,315 
1,035,837 
NA 
54 
25,923 
362 
' 36,600 
' 195,444 
$27,442 
107,179 
4,630 
10 
W 
79,985 
1,829 
' 130,000 
' 24,956 
357 
2,364 
871,179 NA 
34 
' 29,600 
W 
' 36,188 
' 198,531 
$24,054 
108,297 
3,836 
W 
607 
' 99,200 
W 
' 136,252 
' 27,212 
368 
2,417 
21,051,703 
NA 
37 
23,879 
W 
~36,700 
'  ' 194,728 
$27,813 
114,414 
23,273 
W 
W 
76,886 
W 
' ' 147,700 
* ' 29,504 
Masonry thousand short tons 
Portland do. 
Clays metric tons 
Gemstones 
Peat thousand short tons 
Sand and gravel: 
Construction do. 
Industrial do. 
Stone: 
Crushed do. 
Dimension short tons 
Combined value of abrasives (1988-89), lime, stone 
(crushed marl and miscellaneous stones, 1989-90, 
dimension sandstone, 1989-90), and values indicated by 
symbol W 
xx 
xx 
30,358 
406,389 
XX 
XX 
34,657 
434,115 
XX 
XX 
32,176 
431,766 
Total 
~Estimaied. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary
data; vale included with ' Combined vaiuc~ figure. XX Not applicable. ' Production
as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (melding consumption
by producers). 
2Exciodes certain clays; kind and value included with ' Canbb~d value figure.
' Excludes certain stones; kind and value incltaied with ~Combined valte~
figure. 


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