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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Reno, Horace T.
Nickel,   pp. 871-879 ff. PDF (1017.9 KB)


Page 872

872 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
Table 3.—Nickel recovered from nonferrous scrap processed in~the United
States, 
by kind of scrap and form of recovery 
(Short tons) 
Kind of scrap 1971 
1972 
Form of recovery 
1971 
1972 
New scrap: 
 Nickel-base r 1,247 
 Copper-base  r 3,357 Aluminum-base - - - 465 
 —~— 
 Total 5,069 
~- 
Old scrap: 
 Nickel-base 20,832 
 Copper-base  577 Aluminuni-base - - - 358 
3,038 
1,948 
500 
5,486 
29,440 
600 
400 
As metal              
In nickel-base alloys        
In copper-base alloys      
In aluminum-base alloys~.. - 
In ferrous and hightemperature alloys'      
In chemical compounds    
Total           
854 
r 2,093 r 5,332 
774 
17,586 
197 
— ' 26,836 
1,166 
2,6g4 
6,738 
1,056 
24,003 
269 
35,926 
Total 21,767 
30,440 
Grand total r 26,836 
85,926 
o Revised. 
' Includes only nonferrous nickel scrap added to ferrous and high-temperature
alloys. 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 The domestic nickel industry used more than twice as much nickel -in the
form of ferronickel in 1972 than it used in 1971. Essentially all of it was
used in stainless and alloy steels. The pattern of nickel consumption in
1972 was changed little from that of 1971; 28% of the total consumed was
used to make stainless steels, 12% was used in alloy steels, 18% was used
in 
-nickel plating, 26% was used to make high-nickel alloys and superalloys,
and 3% was used in iron castings. International Nickel Co. of Canada, Ltd.
(INCO), which 
in the past has reported statistics on the end-use consumption pattern, did
not do so -for 1972 because of the growing markets 
-in Eastern Europe, the U.S.S.R., and Asia, areas for which accurate statistics
are unavailable. Nevertheless, INCO reported little alteration in consumption
either as to end use or geographical area. End-use market information available
to the Bureau of Mines did not indicate any substantial change in the worldwide
pattern of nickel usage. 
Table 4.—Stocks and consumption of new and old nickel scrap in the
United States (Gross weight, short tons) 
in 1972 
 Stocks, Consumption 
Class of consumer and type of scrap beginning Receipts 
 of year New Old Total 
Stocks, 
end of 
year 
Smelters and refiners: 
 Nickel and nickel alloys 502 9,632 729 6,543 7,272 Monel metal 998 4,938
611 2,808 2,919 Nickel silver' 441 2,897 815 2,067 2,882 Cupronickel '  78
587 -- 525 525 Nickel residues 5,816 1,621 5,501 -- 5,501 
 Total 7,316 16,191 6,841 8,851 15,692 
Foundries and plants of other 
manufacturers: 
 Nickel audnickel alloys 14,672 17,023 1 27,934 27,935 Monet metal 19 186
10 186 146 Nickel silver' 2,397 12,112 11,990 -- 11,990 Cupronickel' 1,253
16,589 16,120 100 16,220 Nickel residues 184 80 -- 155 155 
 Total 14,875 17,239 11 28,225 28,236 
Grand total: 
 Nickel and nickel alloys 15,174 26,655 730 34,477 35,207 Monel metal 1,017
5,074 621 2,444 3,065 Nickelsilver' 2,838 15,009 12,805 2,067 14,872 Cupronickeli
1,331 17,176 16,120 625 16,745 Nickel residues 6,000 1,701 5,501 155 5,656
 Total 22,191 33,430 6,852 37,076 43,928 
2,862 
3,017 
456 
140 
1,936 
7,815 
3,760 
9 
2,519 
1,622 
109 
3,878 
6,622 
3,026 
2,975 
1,762 
2,045 
11,693 
' Excluded from totals because it is copper-base scrap, although containing
considerable nickel. 


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