University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Ecology and Natural Resources Collection

Page View

Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

DeHuff, Gilbert L.
Manganese,   pp. 757-769 ff. PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 758

758 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
 Except for a small quantity of metallurgical oxide nodules shipped from
stocks by The Anaconda Company, and made several years ago from Montana carbonate
ore, there was neither production nor shipment of manganese ore, concentrates,
or nodules in the United States in 1972. 
 Ferruginous manganese ores or concentrates containing 10% to 35% manganese
were produced and shipped from New Mexico, and shipments continued from the
Cuyuna Range of Minnesota. Manganiferous iron ore containing 5% to 10% manganese
was neither produced nor shipped in either 1972 or 1971. Manganiferous zinc
residuum continued to be produced from New Jersey zinc ores. 
Table 2.—Manganese and manganiferous ore shipped un the United States,
by State 
(Short tons) 
Type and State 
1971 
1972 
Gross weight Manganese content 
Gross weight Manganese content 
Manganese ore (35% or more Mn, natural): Montana Total                  
Manganiferous ore: 
Ferruginous manganese ore (10% to 35% Mn, natural): 
Minnesota                             
New Mexico                           
Utah                                 
 Total                          
 Manganiferous iron ore (5% to 10% Mn, natural) 
 Total manganiferous ore  Value manganese and manganiferous ore         
142 
75 
578 
305 
142 
75 
578 
305 
169,732 
28,490 
112 
23,005 
3,504 
37 
119,324 
27,837 
-- 
15,081 
3,646 
-- 
198,334 
26,546 
~ 
147,161 
18,727 
-- 
 198,334 
$1,468,000 
26,546 
- - 
 147,161 
$1,040,000 
18,727 
- - 
 1 Shipments are used as the measure of manganese production for compiling
U.S. mineral production value. They are taken at the point at which the material
is considered to be in marketable form for the consumer. Besides direct shipping
ore, they include, without duplication, concentrate and nodules made from
domestic ores. 
CONSUMPTION, USES, AND STOCKS 
 In the production of raw steel (ingots, continous- or pressure-cast blooms,
billets, slabs, etc., and including steel castings), consumption of manganese
as ferroalloys, metal, and direct-charged ore was 12.6 pounds per short ton
of raw steel produced. Of this total, 11.0 pounds was ferromanganese; 1.2
pounds, silicomanganese; 0.05 pound, spiegeleisen; 0.25 pound, manganese
metal; and 0.1 pound, manganese ore. The comparable 1971 total, on the same
basis, was 13.0 pounds with ferromanganese at 11.2, silicomanganese at 1.3,
spiegeleisen at 0.05, metal at 0.25, and ore at 0.2. It should perhaps be
observed that, in addition to the above consumption of manganese in 1972,
there was consumed per short ton of raw steel produced approximately 1.2
pounds of manganese contained in manganese ore used in making pig iron. In
1971, the quantity was approximately 1.0 pound. This increase in 
the use of manganese ore (containing more than 35% manganese) as blast furnace
feed has been apparent since 1969. 
 Manganese ferroalloy producers proceeded with their air and water pollution
control programs, completion of which will tend to aggravate already existing
problems of adequate power supply. 
Electrolytic Manganese and Manganese 
Metal.—All of the manganese metal produced in the United States was
electrolytic manganese metal, and it is certain that virtually all of that
imported was electrolytic metal. Virtually all of the metal consumed was
electrolytic metal, but it is possible that some low-carbon ferromanganese,
and possibly some manganese-aluminum additives, may have been erroneously
reported by consumers as manganese metal. Production of electrolytic metal
in 1972 was 23,200 short tons, compared with 20,475 tons in 1971, and was
by the same 


Go up to Top of Page