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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Polta, Harold J.
Iron and steel scrap,   pp. 667-681 ff. PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 674

Table 2.—Consumers stocks, receipts, production, consumption, and shipments
of iron 
and steel scrap in 1972, by grade 
(Thousand short tons) 
Grades of scrap Receipts Produc- tion 
Consump- 
tion 
Ship- 
ments 
Stocks 
Dec. 31 
Pig iron  59 - -60 1 6674 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
by steelmakers, and procedures that could lead ' to efficient use of processed
scrap. 
 At Salt Lake City, Utah, Bureau researchers were concluding studies on the
processing of shredded municipal refuse through horizontal and vertical air
classification, and were gathering data to make a cost analysis of the process.
They were also continuing studies directed towards increasing recycling of
obsolete automobiles, and other vehicles. These included studying the economics
of incinerating auto hulks prior to shredding; testing the nonferrous metal
concentrate to determine the most efficient and economic method to separate
aluminum, copper, and zinc die castings; and developing continuous cryogenic
systems for reclaiming copper from insulated wires, crushing tires, and recovering
iron and copper from small motors and generators. 
 At Rolla, Mo., Bureau metallurgists were 
MANUFACTURERS OF STEEL INGOTS AND CASTINGS 
Carbon steel: 
Low-phosphorous plate and punchings 
Cut structural and plate 
No. 1 heavy melting steel 
No. 2 heavy melting steel 
No. 1 and electric furnace bundles 
No. 2 and all other bundles 
Turningsandborings 
Slag scrap (Fe content)_________________ 
Shredded or fragmentized 
All other carbon steel scrap 
Stainless steel___________________________ 
Alloy steel (except stainless)_________________ 
Cast iron (includes borings) 
Other grades of scrap 
U.S. total 
Pig iron 
MANUFACTURERS OF STEEL CASTINGS 
Carbon steel: 
Low-phosphorous plate and punchings 
Cut structural and plate 
No. 1 heavy melting steel 
No. 2 heavy melting steel 
No. 1 and electric furnace bundles 
No. 2 and all other bundles 
Turnings and borings 
Slag scrap (Fe content) 
Shredded or fragmentized 
All other carbon steel scrap 
Stainless steel 
Alloy steel (except stainless) 
Cast iron (includes borings) 
Other grades of scrap 
U.S. total 
investigating the effects of copper and tin, singly and in combination, and
other impurities on properties of ductile iron castings. This research supplemented,
and was coordinated ' with, past and ongoing Bureau sponsored research at
the University of Wisconsin. Because copper and tin are so difficult to remove
when alloyed with iron and steel, these studies were investigating and trying
to determine precisely how copper and tin affect the properties of ferrous
metals containing these elements. 
 ' A complete list of Bureau of Mines scrap-related research efforts is contained
in an information circular on the su'bject.iT 
 17 Kenahan, C. B., R. S. Kaplan, J. T. Dunham, and D. G. Linnehan. Bureau
of Mines Research Programs on Recycling and Disposal of Mineral-, Metal-,
and Energy-Based Wastes. BuMines IC 8595, 1973, 54 pp. 
 523 12 538 4 55 
 526 -- 525 1 50 
 9,018 20,303 27,751 1,913 2,599 
 2,299 1,088 3,362 92 329 
 6,126 730 6,746 87 860 
 2,611 '  524 2,997 126 352 
 1,570 331 1,753 157 178 
 1,404 1,767 3,076 119 86 
 1,508  1,507 1 72 
 3,718 12,609 15,058 1,188 1,066 
 413 575 930 50 99 
 413 2,032 2,457 67 242 
 2,391 4,125 5,234 1,311 1,055 
 1,182 335 1,481 44 23 
 33,702 44,431 73,415 5,160 7,066 
 4,136 88,941 86,207 6,715 1,377 
 528 156 687 4 59 
 171 4 178 -- 8 
 127 71 203 1 20 
 1 -- 1 -- -- 
 101 -- 107 -- 8 
 15 -- 15 -- -- 
 66 8 70 4 6 
 1 4 6 -- -- 
 51 -- 53  3 
 518 282 797 5 67 
 15 14 26 2 8 
 68 70 127 14 20 
 171 118 295 3 38 
 44 56 99 4 6 
 1,877 783 2,664 37 243 


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