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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Sutton, Joseph A.
Columbium and tantalum,   pp. 461-471 ff. PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 465

 COLUMBIUM-TANTALUMTable 6.—Consumption of ferrocolumbium, ferrotantalum-columbium,
and other 
columbium and tantalum materials in the United States in 1972, by end use
End use 
 465 
Pounds of contained 
 columbium plus tantalum 
Steel: 
    Carbon 733,216 
    Stainless and heat resisting 644,936 
    Full alloy 302,740 
    High strength-low alloy 1,141,089 
    Electric W 
    Tool W 
 Superalloys 665,300 
 Alloys (excludes alloy steels and superalloys) 57,387 
 Miscellaneous and unspecified 131,736 
 Total 3,676,404 
 W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included
in "Miscellaneous and unspecified." 
STOCKS 
 The following ycarend columbium and tantalum materials (given in pounds)
were reported in inventories: 
Material 
Dec. 31, 
1971 
Dec. 31, 1972 
COLUMBIUM 
Primary metal           
Ingot                  
Scrap                  
Oxide                
Other compounds         
60,303 
45,324 
67,503 
1,051,357 
' 527,976 
55,984 
62,826 
75,483 
553,800 
142,539 
TANTALUM 
Primary metal           
Capacitor-grade powder     
Ingot                  
Scrap                  
Oxide                  
269,249 
163,320 
86,452 
' 272,359 
' 106,700 
267,975 
154,871 
56,074 
232,039 
90,386 
Potassium tantalum fluoride (K,TaF7)             
Other compounds         
' 246,760 
53,536 
163,606 
12,802 
Revised. 
 Stocks of columbium and tantalum raw materials, as reported by consumers
and 
dealers at yearend 1972, were as follows (in short tons—l971 figures
in parentheses): Columbite, 1,104 (521) ; tantalite, 1,120 (1,322); pyrochlore,
501 (595); tin slag, 33,775 (35,787); and other, 61 (none). 
 Consumers inventories of ferrocolumbium and ferrotantalum-columbium as of
December 31, 1972, were as follows (with 
1971 yearencl stocks in parentheses): Ferrocolumbiurn, 814,607 pounds contained
columbium (758,828); ferrotantalum-columbium, 18,592 pounds contained columbium
plus tantalum (34,737); and other columbium and tantalum materials, 40,061
pounds contained columbium plus tantalum (31,818). Producer stocks of ferrocolumbium
at yearend 1972 were 638,000 
pounds contained columbium (534,000). 
PRICES 
 Prices for columbite and pyrochlore, as reported by Metals Week, were higher
at the end of 1972 than at -the end of 1971. 
Columbite ore, c.i.f. U.S. ports, increased 
from $0.75—$0.85 per pound of contained pentoxides for material having
a Cb205-toTa205 rat-jo of 10 to 1 at the beginning of the year to $l.10—$1.l5
per pound at year- 
end. Contract rates for Canadian pyrochlore, fo.b. mine and mill, went from
$1.15—$l.20 per pound of Cb2O5 content to 
$1.37 after being down to $0.95 in the first quarter. Those for Brazilian
pyrochlore similarly went from $1.15 to $1.37. Spot 
prices for tantalite ore, 60-percent basis, 
c.i.f. U.S. ports, were quoted at $6.25—$6.75 per pound Ta205 at the
beginning of the year and $5.25—$6.00 per pound at yearend. 
 Quoted prices for various grades of ferrocolumbium were unchanged during
the year: Low-alloy standard grades, ton lots, 
f.o.b. shipping point, $2.45—$2.65 per pound of columbium content;
high-purity grades, $4.l2—$6.8l. 
 -The price of columbium and tantalum metal remained unchanged during the
year. Columbium powder was quoted at 


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