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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Arndt, Robert H.
Missouri,   pp. 299-314 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 309

THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF MISSOURI 
309 
in both years was achieved by three firms: 
Dundee Cement Co., Harbison-Walker Refractories, division of Dresser Industries,
Inc., and Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp. Clay was mined in 22 counties,
most ~f which are in east-central Missouri. In addition, mining occurred
in one county in the north-central part of the State, two counties adjacent
to Kansas City, and two counties in the southeast adjacent to the Mississippi
River. The leading counties, in order of decreasing output, were Pike (common
clay), Gasconade (kaolin and fire clay), Montgomery (fire ciny), and Audrain
(fire clay). Their combined output in 1979 exceeded 55% of the State's total
clay production. Common clay and shale were also produced in Boone, Butler,
Cape Girardeau, Crawford, Jackson, Jefferson, Livingston, Platte, Ralls,
and St. Louis Counties. Fire clay was also mined in Callaway, Franklin, Manes,
Monroe, Montgomery, Osage, St. Charles, and Warren Counties. Fuller's earth
was mined in Scott County in 1978. About 63% of all the clay mined was common
clay and shale, 34% was fire clay and kaolin, and fuller's earth made up
the 
remainder. Fire clay provided approximately 73% of the value of the clay
produced in Missouri, followed by 22% from common clay and shale; the remainder
came from kaolin and fuller's earth. Fire clay had an average unit value
of about $19 per ton in 1979. The unit values of kaolin and common clay and
shale were about $17.83 and $2.91 per ton, respectively. Fuller's earth produced
in 1978 had a unit value of about $45 per ton. About 75% of the fire clay
was used in the manufacture of fire brick, blocks, and shapes. High-aluminum
refractories; refractory grogs; refractory mortar and cement; and medical,
pharmaceutical, and cosmetic items were other manufactures from fire clay.
Aluminum sulfate (alum) was manufactured from kaolin. Face brick and common
brick, portland cement, lightweight aggregate for concrete block, and flower
pots were manufactured from common clay and shale. Fuller's earth was used
in the preparation of oil and grease absorbents and in pesticide carriers
and related products. The manufacture of portland cement utilized about 74%
of common clay and shale. 
Table 9.—Missouri: Clays sold or used by producers, by kind 
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars) 
Year 
Fire 
Quantity 
clay 
Value 
Comm 
Quantity 
on clay Value 
Other 
Quantity 
clays 
Value 
To 
Quantity 
tal 
Value 
1975                    
1976                    
1977                    
1978                    
1979                    
854 
809 
872 
773 
799 
11,285 
11,723 
12,529 
12,190 
15,194 
1,209 
1,256 
1,432 
1,434 
1,497 
1,928 
2,124 
3,190 
3,817 
4,350 
' 105 
' 68 
169 
151 
' 55 
W 
11,068 il,173 
i873 
~978 
2,063 
2,133 
2,373 
2,258 
2,351 
213,214 
14,915 
16,892 
16,880 
20,522 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data; excluded from total.
iKaolin 
2Data do not add to total shown because of independent rounding. 
 Lime.—Led by output from the Ste. Genevieve plant of Mississippi
Lime
Co., the Nation's most productive such plant in 1979, Missouri's lime production
ranked third in the Nation. Output of lime had increased annually from 1975
through 1978, but declined slightly in 1979 to a level about 11.5% greater
than in 1975. Annual increases of value in 4 successive years brought the
value of produced lime in 1979 to about 73% above the 1975 value. Annual
average unit value of lime also increased from about $23.30 per short ton
in 1975 to $39.21 per short ton in 1979. About 79% of the product and 73%
of the product value was quicklime; the remainder was hydrated lime. Valley
Mineral Products Corp. at Bonne Terre produced dolomitic quicklime 
and refractory dolomite; Ash Grove Cement Co. at Springfield and Mississippi
Lime Co. at Ste. Genevieve prepared high-calcium lime. Total shipments of
lime from all sources to consumers in Missouri were 229,000 tons in 1978
and 223,000 tons in 
1979. The principal uses of lime were in steel manufacturing, in water treatment,
and for manufacture of chemicals. 
 Perlite.—J. J. Brouk & Co. in St. Louis and Georgia Pacific
Corp.
in Cuba expanded perlite in 1979. Production remained essentially unchanged
during the 2 years, but the value of the perlite increased as a result of
a rise of almost 15% in unit value. The expanded perlite was used in the
preparation of plaster and concrete, for low-temperature insulation and cavity
fill, as a 


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