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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Hill, James J.; Prosser, L. J., Jr.
Illinois,   pp. 177-187 ff. PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 180

600 
400 
200 — 
*....'  STONE 
 0 I 
 1977 1980 1985 
Figure 1.—Value of stone and total value of nonfuel mineral production
in Illinois. 
180 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
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 HB-2912—Amended the 
Surface-Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Act of 1971 to allow the
State to participate in enforcing the interim regulations of the Federal
Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. 
 HB-157—Required a study of underground mining practices, subsidence
problems, and available technology for —combating subsidence and
required
that a report be submitted to the legislature with recommendations for the
protection of Illinois homeowners. 
 HB-158—Provided subsidence insurance to Illinois residents against
the effects of underground coal, clay, limestone, and fluorspar mines. 
 HB-0518—Amended the 
Surface-Mined Land Conservation and Reclamation Act to extend the life of
the Aggregates Mining Problems Study Commission until 1983. 
 HB-1382—Provided funding for the State's Mine Subsidence Insurance
Fund. 
 Also during - the 1978-79 period, other laws were enacted to bring the State
into compliance with the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act
of 1977. 
 In late 1978, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale was designated
as a State Mining and Mineral Resources and Research Institute by the Secretary
of the Interior. Southern Illinois was one of 31 schools and universities
in the United States that was planning to establish training programs in
mining and minerals extraction. Annual allotments were provided to the University
through fiscal year 1984 under the auspices of the Surface Mining Control
and Reclamation Act of 1977. Initially, the Institute received a basic grant
of $110,000 and $160,000 for scholarships and fellowships. 
 In 1978 and 1979, the Illinois Geological Survey continued research programs
in basic geology, geochemistry, mineral resources, mineral economics, and
the environment. Clays and shales were investigated to determine their occurrence,
composition, and ceramic properties. High-purity 


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