University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Ecology and Natural Resources Collection

Page View

Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Starch, Karl E.
Colorado,   pp. 105-121 ff. PDF (2.2 MB)


Page 106

106 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
Table 1.—Nonfuel mineral production in Colorado' 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Value 
Value 
Value 
Mineral 
. 
Quantity 
~ 
(thou- 
sands) 
Quantity 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
(thou 
sands) 
Clays2 - — — — — — —
thousand~ short
tons_ — Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
 metric tons_ — Gemstones                       
961 
1,720 NA 
$4,712 
2,533 
100 
548 
1,191 NA 
$2,753 
1,747 
 75 
521 
362 NA 
$2,717 
 742 
 70 
Gold (recoverable content of ores, etc.) troy ounces — —
Gypsum
       thousand short tons — Lead (recoverable content of ores,
etc.)
 metric tons~ 
Lime_ - thousand short tons - 
Peat — do~_.. 
72,668 
 211 
20,860 
 180 
 32 
10,777 
1,121 
14,118 
5,413 
 195 
32,094 
 235 
15,151 
 W 
 30 
6,212 
 882 
11,257 
 W 
 188 
13,850 
 275 
7,554 W 
 33 
4,259 
1,727 
8,767 
 W 
299 
Sand and gravel do — — — 
Silver (recoverable content of ores, etc.) thousand troy ounces —
Stone: 
~23,910 
4,663 
~50,527 
21,545 
26,493 
4,217 
58,596 
22,773 
25,680 
2,809 
~56,263 
31,151 
Crushed — — — — thousand short tons_
— 
Dimension do.__ 
5,597 
 5 
14,169 
 181 
6,229 
 5 
15,683 
 178 
6,835 
 3 
19,435 
 163 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.) metric tons— —
Combined
value of beryllium (1978), carbun dioxide, cement, clays (bentonite), feldspar
(1977-78), iron ore, molybdenum, perlite, pumice, pyrites, salt, sand and
gravel (industrial, 1977 and 1979), 
36,530 
27,704 
22,208 
15,178 
9,910 
8,149 
. 
tin, tungsten concentrate, vanadium, and values indicated by symbol W —
— — — Total                        
)Q( 
r384,445 
XX 
506,304 
XX 
692,356 
)Q( 
r537 540 
XX 
641,826 
XX 
826,098 
 NA Not available. rRe~sed W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary
date; value included in "Combined value" figure. XX Not applicable.
 ' Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
 2Excludes bentonite; value included in "Combined value" figure.
 3Excludes industrial sand and gravel; value included in "Combined value"
figure. 
 Legislation and Government Programs—Colorado's mineral severance
tax
became law on January 1, 1978. Five categories of minerals are taxed, including
molybdenum and other metallic minerals. However, since the first $11 million
of gross income is exempted from the tax, no other metallic mineral mines
yet qualify to be taxed. AMAX Inc., the only molybdenum producer in the State,
pays $0.15 per ton of molybdenum ore produced. In 1978, the tax brought in
$16 million in revenue to the State; $3.6 million from molybdenum production.
Receipts from the severance tax are distributed 40% to the State's general
fund, 15% to the severance trust fund, and 45% to the local government tax
fund. A proposal in the 1979 legislature to double the severance tax was
rejected in committee. A State law enacted in 1979 allows companies developing
new mineral operations to "prepay" severance taxes directly to
affected local
governmental agencies, including school districts, so that funds are available
when most needed to meet the costs of increased population related to the
new mining operation. 
 The Federal Mine Safety Act of 1977, effective March 1978, transferred responsibility
for mine safety inspection from the State Division of Mines to the Mine Safety
and Health Administration (MSHA) of the U.S. Department of Labor. The role
of the State Division of Mines became one of training certification, education
of miners, and to provide technical assistance to small mine owners. In 1979,
State mine safety statutes were rewritten as the State sought a continuing
role in mine safety inspection of small mines. The future role of the State
Division of Mines is still uncertain. Smaller mine operators supported the
Colorado Legislative Memorial asking Congress to let States regulate mining.
 A Federal law enacted in 1978 provides for cleanup of abandoned radioactive
uranium mill tailings in the West, with the Federal Government to pay 90%
of the cleanup costs, and States to pay 10%. Colorado sites eligible for
cleanup funds are Durango and Rifle (two sites each), Gunnison, Maybell,
Naturita, and Slick Rock. 
 Among contracts awarded by the Bureau of Mines during the biennium was a
$159,000 contract to develop low-cost methods for sealing the surface openings
to abandoned mines in western Colorado. 
 The State received $11 million as its share of Federal mineral leasing,
bonuses, royalties, and rentals for fiscal year 1979 which ran from October
1, 1978, through September 30, 1979. Under the Mineral 


Go up to Top of Page