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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Lockard, D. W.; Davis, J. F.; Morton, P.K.
California,   pp. 91-103 ff. PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 92

Table 1.—Nonfuel mineral production in Californial 
Mineral 
Quantity 
1977 
y~ 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
1978 
vi 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
1979 
vF~ 
(thousands) 
Asbestos short tons_ — 
Boron minerals thousand short tons_ — 
Cement: 
  Masonry do___  Portland do___Clays do.___ 
Copper (recoverable content of ores, 
 etc.) metric tons — 
76,247 
1,469 
w 
9,271 
2,655 
200 
$18,372 
236,163 
w 
406,185 
12,179 
295 
70,728 
1,554 
w 
9,290 
2,479 
~ 
W 
$19,281 
279,927 
w 
473,486 
15,106 
w 
76,332 
1,590 
w 
9,724 
2,531 
W 
$20,434 
310,211 
w 
541,815 
18,621 
W 
Diatomite — — — thousand short tons_ —
Gemstones
Gold (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
 troy ounces_ — Gypsum — — — —
thousand short
tons_ — Lead (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
 metric tons_ — Lime       thousand short tons_ — Mercury
     76-pound flasks - 
Pumice thousand short tons.. — 
Sand and gravel do_ — — — 
Silver (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
thousand troy ounces_ — 
Stone: 
Crushed — — thousand short tons_ — 
 Dimension do.. — — — 
Talc short tons.~ 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
 metric tons - 
Combined value of calcium chloride, carbon dioxide, feldspar, iron ore, lithium
compounds (1977-78), magnesium compounds, molybdenum, peat, perlite, phosphate
rock (1977), potassium salts, rare-earth concentrates, salt, sodium carbonates,
sodium sulfates, tungsten, and values indicated by symbol W             
Total                     
397 
NA 
5,704 
1,629 
3 
598 
W 
636 
109,135 
58 
34,011 
26 
95,602 
2 
XX 
43,405 
230 
846 
8,500 
2 
24,074 
W 
3,838 
250,951 
267 
80,146 
996 
2,373 
1 
241,064 
379 
NA 
7,480 
1,578 
w 
522 
- - 
831 
115,100 
58 
37,856 
24 
105,865 
w 
XX 
48,998 
240 
1,448 
9,017 
w 
21,691 
- - 
3,458 
281,400 
313 
93,377 
921 
3,795 
w 
~ 
259,232 
422 
NA 
3,195 
1,624 
2 
564 
151 
800 
129,348 
64 
39,742 
41 
175,752 
w 
XX 
60,989 
240 
982 
10,354 
2 
25,545 
43 
3,973 
347,385 
712 
106,227 
2,258 
6,960 
w 
312,924 
XX 
1,329,887 
XX 
1,511,690 
XX 
1,769,675 
 NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary date;
value included in "Combined value" figure. XX Not applicable. 
 ' Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
92 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
 In May 1979, the Department of the Interior issued an emergency land withdrawal
totaling 69,305 acres in Ventura County. This action was taken to prevent
area degradation by proposed uranium mineral exploration and to protect the
Cositas Reservoir watershed for the cities of Ojai and Ventura. 
 A number of wilderness mineral resource assessment studies were in progress
by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in the State during 1978-79. These studies were
in the Carson Iceberg area (200,000 acres), Hoover Wilderness Area (100,000
acres), John Muir Wilderness Area (503,000 acres), North Fork of the American
River study area (45,000 acres), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area (357,000 acres),
and the Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness Area (113,000 acres). The report
on the Snow Mountain Study area (37,000 acres) was released as an open file
report. RARE II mineral studies were underway in an additional 16 areas totaling
361,000 acres. Mineral assessments on BLM lands included Baker-Cypress/Lava
Rock (20,000 acres) and Chemise Mountain-Kings 
Range (30,000 acres). 
 Assembly Joint Resolution 91 (AJR-91) was passed by the California legislature
in 1978. The resolution requested that Congress move immediately to solve
the steel import problem, created because foreign firms were underpricing
local steel producers. The import problem was threatening to create economic
problems for the State's iron and steel industry. 
 According to a 1978 staff study by the South Coast Air Quality Management
District (SCAQMD), industry in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino
Counties may be required to spend an additional $890 million by 1985 to meet
stringent air quality standards. The costs would fall heavily on refineries
and on the Kaiser Steel facilities at Fontana. 
 The California Division of Mines and Geology had numerous scientific and
geologic studies underway during the past 2 years. Research studies through
the Geologic Hazards Program continued, such as active fault evaluation,
cooperative studies with the U.S. Geological Survey on earth- 


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