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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Pittman, Tom L.
Alaska,   pp. 43-51 ff. PDF (952.3 KB)


Page 49

Concrete aggregate_______ 
Plaster and gunite sands - - - - 
Concrete products________ 
Asphaltic concrete________ 
Roadbase and coverings - - — — Fill 
Snow and ice control_______ 
Otheruses_____________ 
 7,217 $34,734 $4.81 7,960 $40,113 $5.04 4,161 $20,457 $4.92 
 NA NA  NA w w  w w w w 
 77 309 4.00 w w  w w w w 
 3,205 12,499 3.90 3,748 14,948 3.99 392 1,676 4.28 
 2,605 6,718 2.58 2,863 7,538 2.63 1,422 3,701 2.60 
 53,113 79,571 1.50 54,253 81,373 1.50 44,596 78,004 1.75 
 NA NA  NA 334 W  w w w w 
 209 423 2.02 30 40 1.34 82 267 3.24 
Total' or average 66,426 134,251 2.02 69,300 145,300 2.10 50,900 104,905
2.06 
Table 6.—Alaska: Construction sand and gravel sold or used by producers
THE. MINERAL INDUSTRY OF ALASKA 
49 
Jade Mountain area and barged westerly down the Kobuk River to Kotzebue.
Part of the jade is used there in Native handicrafts; the balance is shipped
to other domestic or foreign destinations. Most of the soapstone is produced
and marketed by the Hill family of Palmer, which mines it near the head of
Grubstake Gulch in the Talkeetna Mountains. 
 Gypsum.—Domtar, Inc., a Canadian company, acquired the old Pacific
Coast gypsum mine when it purchased the gypsum assets of Kaiser Cement and
Gypsum Corp. Domtar has located a block of new claims adjoining the patented
claims of the old mine. This property is on the east coast of 
Chichagof Island, about 35 miles southwest of Juneau. 
 Sand and GraveL—Sand and gravel production reported in 1978 totaled
69.3 million short tons; in 1979, reported production was 50.9 million short
tons. All of the sand and gravel produced in 1978 and 1979 was classed as
construction aggregate. Principal uses of the total aggregate reported in
the biennium were as follows: fill, 78% in 1978 and 88% in 1979; concrete
aggregate, 11% in 1978 and 8% in 1979; roadbase and coverings, 4% in 1978
and 3% in 1979;and asphaltic concrete, 5% in 1978 and 1% in 1979. 
Table 5.—Alaska: Construction sand and gravel sold or used, by
major
use category 
 QuantityUse (thous-  and  short 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(thous- 
and 
short 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
Quantity 
(thous- 
and 
short 
Value 
(thou- 
sands) 
Value 
per 
ton 
tons) 
tons) 
tons) 
NA Not available. W withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data;
included in "Total." 1Data may not add to totals shown because
of independent
rounding. 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Quantity (thous- 
Value 
Value 
Quantity 
(thous- 
Value 
Value 
Quantity 
(thous- 
Value 
Value 
and 
short 
(thou- 
sands) 
per 
ton 
an& 
short\ 
(thou- 
sands) 
per 
ton 
and 
short 
(thou- 
sands) 
per 
ton 
tons) 
tons) 
tons) 
Sand 
Gravel 
59,421 $119,655 
7,005 14,595 
$2.01 
2.08 
63,143 $131,215 
6,152 .14,057 
$2.08 
2.29 
45,551 
5,349 
$91,845 
13,060 
$2.02 
2.44 
 Total1 or average 66,426 134,251 2.02 69,300 145,300 2.10 50,900 104,905
2.06 
1Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding. 
 Stone.—All of the stone reported pro surface treatment (0.9%),
agricultural
limeduced in 1978 and 1979 was crushed stone. stone (0.8%) and rip rap and
jetty (0.6%). No dimension stone was reported. The principal uses reported
in 1979 were unspecified Alaska mineral specialist, Bureau of Mines, Juneau,
aggregate (86.5%), dense roadbase (10.4%), 


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