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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals and minerals 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 1 (1978-1979)

Collins, Cynthia T.
Iron oxide pigments,   pp. 457-464 PDF (730.7 KB)


Page 458

DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
Table 2—Finished iron oxide pigments sold by processors in the
United
States by kind 
Pigment 
1978 
Quantity Value 
(short tons) (thousands) 
1979 
Quantity 
(short tons) 
Value 
(thousands) 
Natural: 
Biack:Magnetite                                
Brown: 
10,707 
$1,219 
8,075 
$906 
Ironoxide1                                   
8,151 
2,260 
10,075 
3,481 
Umbers: 
Burnt                               Raw                                 
Red: 
5,546 
2,040 
2,868 
936 
4,495 
1,782 
2,665 
970 
. 
Ironoxide2                                  Sienna, burnt               
40,476 
665 
3,596 
416 
40,618 
647 
3,953 
464 
Yellow: 
Ocher3                                      
Sienna,raw                                   
 Totainaturai4                               
Synthetic: 
Brown: Iron oxide5                               
Red: Iron oxides                                 
Yellow:Ironoxide                               
Other:Speciaityoxides                            
 Totaisynthetic4                             Mixtures of natural and synthetic
iron oxides             
 Grandtotal4                                
7,588 
745 
913 
380 
6,865 
683 
945 
399 
75,918 
12,588 
73,240 
13,782 
11,351 
26,433 
25,916 
8,969 
10,364 
25,267 
22,725 
7,951 
11,404 
33,344 
24,550 
10,291 
11,319 
32,540 
22,651 
12,053 
72,669 
3,923 
66,307 
2,935 
79,590 
3,205 
78,563 
1,830 
152,510 
81,830 
156,036 
94,175 
' Includes Vandyke brown. 
' Includes pyrite cinder. 
3lncludes yellow iron oxide. 
4Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding. ' Includes
synthetic black iron oxide. 
458 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
 Table 2 reflects sales data compiled from responses by 19 companies (see
table 3) to the Bureau of Mines annual canvass. This represents 95% coverage
of all companies that produce finished natural and/or synthetic iron oxide
pigments from raw materials. The increase in production in 1979 was due to
the entrance into the domestic market of Mobay Chemical Corp.'s new synthetic
pigment plant in West Virginia. The gain in 1979 production was partially
offset by the loss of natural oxide production from Mineral Pigments Corp.;
also, a softening of demand in the last quarter of the year resulted in slight
decreases in annual sales for some companies. 
 Domestic mine production of crude iron oxide pigments is shown in table
1, and producers are listed at the end of table 3. 
Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co. closed the Mather underground iron mine at Negaunee,
Mich., on July 31, 1979. Ore from the mine and associated beneficiating plants
was used principally in pig iron production, but crude hematite was also
shipped annually for pigments. The mine was the principal domestic producer
of crude iron oxide pigments for many years. 
 Five steel companies produced byproduct iron oxide from plant wastes in
1978-79. Regenerated oxide from spent pickle liquor was used principally
in the manufacture of ferrites, and some was used for pigments in industrial
coatings. About one-third ol the iron oxides derived from flue dust were
used as a foundry sand additive, one-third in welding electrode manufacture,
and onethird in fertilizer production. 


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