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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals and minerals 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 1 (1978-1979)

Lucas, John M.
Cadmium,   pp. 139-145 ff. PDF (722.3 KB)


Page 140

140 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1978-79 
Table 1.—Salient cadmium statistics 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
United States: 
Production' metric tons~Shipments by producers2 do~~   Value thousands —
1,990 
742 
$4,166 
2,047 
2,707 
$10,498 
1,999 
1,837 
$7,072 
1,653 
1,957 
$5,906 
1,715 
2,370 
$9,498 
  Exports metric tons  Imports for consumption, metal do — —
—  Apparent consumption do__  Price: Average per pound3       
          World: Production metric tons — 
180 
2,375 
3,055 
$3.36 
15,234 
229 
3,094 
5,381 
$2.66 
16,773 
107 
2,332 
3,818 
$2.96 
17,935 
326 
2,881 
4,510 
$2.45 
16,765 
211 
2,572 
4,817 
$2.76 
18,280 
 ' Primary and secondary cadmium metaL Includes equivalent metal content
of cadmium sponge used directly in production of compounds. 
 2lncludes metal consumed at producer plants. 
 3Average quoted price for cadmium sticks and balls in lots of 1 to 5 tons.
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
 Domestic cadmium metal production in 
1979 increased slightly over that of 1978; 
however, production during, both years failed to reach levels achieved during
1976 and 
1977. 
 In mid-December 1979, St. Joe Zinc Co., a major producer of zinc and byproduct
cadmium, announced the permanent closure of its electrothermic zinc smelter
at Monaca, Pa. The company was studying the feasibility of replacing the
Monaca facility with a new electrolytic smelter at an unspecified location.
 In 1978 recovery of cadmium metal averaged just over 4 kilograms per ton
of slab zinc produced in domestic smelters, compared with an average of 4.8
kilograms recovered between 1973 and 1977. Recovery of cadmium in domestic
smelters between 1964 and 1973 ranged from 4.2 to 6.3 kilograms per ton of
slab zinc. 
 During 1979 production of cadmium com-~ pounds other than cadmium sulfide
(cadmium content), which includes both electroplating salts and cadmium oxide,
increased over.that of 1978. The quantity of cadmium produced under this
category has, with a few exceptions, registered a steady increase in recent
years. Production in 1979, for example, was 30 times greater than that of
1971. Cadmium oxide was produced at two primary-metal-producing plants. Data
on cadmium oxide production are not published to avoid disclosing company
proprietary data. The production of cadmium sulfide (including cadmium sulfoselenide
and lithopone) during 1979 registered a significant increase over 1978 production.
Table 2.— Primary cadmium producers in the United States in 1978
and
1979 
Company 
Plant location 
Amax Zinc Co., Inc         
ASARCO incorporated - - - - 
Sauget, Ill. Corpus Christi, Tex., and Denver, Cob. 
The Bunker Hill Co        
Jersey Miniere Zinc Co - - - - 
National Zinc Co          
Kellogg, Idaho 
Clarksville, Tenn. 
Bartlesville, Okia. 
The New Jersey Zinc Co - - - 
St. Joe Zinc Co.1           
Palmerton, Pa. Monaca, Pa. 
1Cbosed permanently Dec. 21, 1979. 
Table 3.—U.S. production of cadmium compounds other than cadmium
sulfide'
(Metric tens) 
Year 
Quantity 
(cadmium 
content) 
1975 
202 
1976 
990 
1977 
695 
1978 
708 
1979 
912 
' Includes platin 
g salts and oxide. 
Table 4.—Cadmium sulfide1 produced in 
the United States 
(Metric tons) 
Ye r 
a 
Quantity 
(cadmium content) 
1975                       
895 
1976                       
729 
1977                       
639 
1978                       
698 
1979                       
1,494 
1includes cadmium lithopone and cadmium sulfoselenide. 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 The apparent consumption of cadmium in 1978 was 18% greater than that of
1977, and in 1979 was 7% greater than that of 1978. 
Though actual consumption data are not gathered by the Bureau of Mines, the
distribution of apparent consumption during 


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