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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals and minerals 1977
Year 1977, Volume 1 (1977)

Petkof, Benjamin
Beryllium,   pp. 183-186 PDF (360.8 KB)


Page 186

186 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1977 
Table 4.—Beryl: World production, by country 
(Short tons) 
Country' 
1975 
1976 
1977" 
Ailgoine                                               
Argentina                                             
Brazile                                                
35 
303 
' ~77O 
(2) 
123 
500 
—— e110 
470 
Madagascar                                            
17 
19 
e15 
Mozambique                                            
r9 
e10 
e10 
Portugal                                               
Rhodesia, Southerne                                       
Rwanda                                               
r23 
70 
20 
70 
"TO 
70 
e50 
South Africa, Republic of  
Ugandae                                              
u.s.s.R.e                                              
United States                                           
 r3 
 60 
1,760 W 
 60 
1,820 W 
 e~ 
 50 
1,870 W 
Zambiae                                              Total              
220 
r3,~ 
2,675 
2,656 
 eEstimate "Preliminary. rRevised. W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual
company confidential data. 
 ' In addition to the countries listed, Bolivia and the Territory of South-West
Africa (Namibia) may also have produced beryl, but available information
is inadequate to formulate reliableestimates of output levels. 
 2Revised tozero. 
TECHNOLOGY 
 Studies relating to the formation of beryllium deposits in western Utah
have been reviewed to develop favorable indicators of the presence of epithermal
beryllium and associated deposits.2 
 A method was devised for manufacturing a thin-walled beryllium metal structure.
The process required beryllium powder that was mixed with a minor quantity
of silicon powder. The mix was plasma-sprayed on to a substrate, removed,
exposed to a wet atmosphere to pick up moisture, placed in a sizing die with
a coefficient of expansion similar to that of beryllium, out-gassed in a
vacuum at high temperature, and fmally sintered in an inert atmosphere.3
 A method to measure beryllium concen 
trations in particulate matter using chelation gas chromatography was developed.
This technique was used to observe beryllium levels in suspended particulate
matter in ambient air conditions over rural, suburban, and industrial environments.
A description of experimental data and techniques was presented.~ 
 ' Physical scientist, Division of Nonferrous Metals. 
 2Lindsey, D. A. Epithermal Beryllium Deposits in Water-Laid Tuft; Western
Utah. Econ. Geol, v. 7Z 1977, pp. 219-232. 
 3Hovis, V. M. Jr., and W. G. Northcutt, Jr. (assiçied to the
US.
Energy Research and Development Admuiistration). Method for Fabricating Beryffium
Structures. US. Pat. 4,011,076, Mar. 8, 1977. 
 4Ross, W. D., J. L Pyle, and R. E. Sievers. Analysis for Beryllium in Ambient
Air Particulates by Gas Chromatography. Environmental Sd. & TechnoL.
v. 11, No.5, May 1977, pp. 467-471. 


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