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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Brown, Brinton C.
Indiana,   pp. 245-267 ff. PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 257

Table 8.—Indiana: Limestone and dolomite sold or used by producers,
by county—Continued 
(Thousand short tons and thousand dollars) 
County 
1971 
Quantity 
~— Value 
1972 
Quantity 
Value 
Type of stone produced in 
1972 
Putnam               
Randolph              
Ripley                
Rush                 
Scott                 
Shelby                
Sullivan               
Switzerland             
Vigo                  
Wabash                
Warrick               
Washington             
Wayne                
Wells                 
White                 
Total             
2,774 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
15 
- - 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
4,060 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
40 
- 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
2,861 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
11 
63 
W 
W 
14 
W 
180 
W 
W 
4,094 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
30 
115 
W 
W 
44 
W 
297 W 
W 
Crushed. 
Do. 
Do. 
Dimension and crushed. Crushed. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
26,199 
48,051 
27,238 
50,204 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing 
individual 
company 
confidential 
data; included 
in "Total." 
Table 9.—Indiana: Calcareous marl 
production 
THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF INDIANA 
257 
Year Number of Short Value 
producers 
tons 
 1968 13 35,828 $28,311 
 1969 12 31,671 30,190 
 1970 12 23,208 23,436 
 1971 12 29,074 26,095 
 1972 9 26,137 24,171 
 Berry Materials Corp. ceased operations at its Versailles quarry and reactivated
the Old Cord Stone quarry about half a mile south of the Versailles quarry
in Ripley County. France Stone Co. acquired the May Stone and Sand, Inc.,
operations in Allen County. In January, Empire Resources International, Tulsa,
Okla. purchased the Radcliff, Inc., quarry near Orleans, Orange County. 
 Sulfur.—Using the Mathieson-Fluor proc. ess, American Oil Co., (Amoco)
recovered byproduct sulfur from crude petroleum at its Whiting refinery in
Lake County. Early in the year Cities Service Oil Co. started operation of
new sulfur removal and recovery facilities at its East Chicago refinery in
Lake County. The new unit has a daily capacity of 50 tons of sulfur removed
from refinery fuel gases, light hydrocarbon liquids, and distillate fuel
oils. New equipment in the $3.5 million facility comprise a sulfur recovery
unit, an amine absorption system, and a distillate hydrotreater. The distillate
hydrotreater removes about 90% of the sulfur compounds from 9,000 barrels
a day of distillate fuel oil product. In late 
December Cities Service suspended refinery operations. Atlantic Richfield
Co. recovered sulfur at its refinery in Lake County. 
 Sales of elemental sulfur increased 111% in quantity and 146% in value.
MINERAL FUELS 
 Coal (Bituminous).—Ranking seventh in the United States, Indiana's
coal production increased 21% in quantity and 31% in value. The average price
increased 40 cents a ton to $5.58 for all coal mined in the State. The price
of strip mine coal increased to $5.51 a ton and the price of underground
coal rose slightly to $6.62 a ton. Production of underground coal decreased
18% as a result of the abandonment of the Thunderbird mine, Indiana's largest
underground mine, operated by AMAX Coal Corp. in Sullivan County on May 26,
1972. About 94% of the coal was produced at 36 strip mines by 26 companies
in nine counties; the remainder was mined in *four underground mines. The
largest underground mine, operated by Kings Station Coal Co. in Gibson County,
produced 950,493 tons during the year. About 34% of the coal was mined in
Warrick County. Peabody Coal Co. was the State's largest producer followed
by AMAX Coal Co. and Enos Coal Corp. 
 Overburden at strip mines ranged in thickness from 15 to 97 feet. The thickness
of the strip coal seams ranged from 24 to 57 inches with small tonnages produced
from seams up to 82 inches thick. Underground mine coal seams ranged in thickness
from 71 to 80 inches. 


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