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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Stevens, Richard F., Jr.
Tungsten,   pp. 1239-1259 ff. PDF (2.4 MB)


Page 1240

1240 
MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
sale, for domestic consumption only, at a "shelf" price of $55 per short
ton unit adjusted for premiums and penalties. Excess tungsten concentrate,
for export, was offered for sale on a monthly sealed-bid basis under PMDS-ORES-123.
No concentrate was sold during the year under this program. 
 HR. 1257, a bill to temporarily suspend the import duty on tungsten concentrate
and on other materials in chief value of tungsten, primarily synthetic scheelite,
was introduced before the 93rd Congress on January 3, 1973, and referred
to the Committee on Ways and Means. 
 The first report by the Secretary of the Interior made under the Mining
and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (Public Law 91—631) was released during
the year and evaluated the domestic tungsten market.3 The independent National
Commission on 
Materials Policy, which was formed by Public Law 91—512 on October
26, 1970, to update the 1952 report of the President's Materials Policy Commission,
the Paley Commission, and review the Government's policy on materials, issued
two interim reports.4 The Commission's final report, with its findings and
recommendations, will be submitted to the President and to the Congress no
later than June 30, 1973. 
 a Department of the Interior. First Annual Report of the Secretary of the
Interior Under the Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (Public Law 91—631).
March 1972, 142 pp. 
 ______ First Annual Report of the Secretary of the Interior Under the Mining
and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (Public Law 91—631 ) —Appendices.
March 1972, 436 pp. 
 4 National Commission on Materials Policy. Toward a National Materials Policy—World
Perspective. january 1973, 87 pp. 
 Towards a National Materials Policy— Basic Data and Issues. April
1972, 64 pp. 
Table 2.—U.S. Government tungsten stockpile materials inventories and
objectives 
(Thousand poun 
ds, tungsten content) 
Material 
Inventory by 
program D 
ec. 31, 1972 
Objective National (strategic) 
stockpile 
DPA 
inventory 
Supplemental stockpile 
Total 
Tungsten ore and concentrate:' 
Stockpile grade                       
Nonstockpile grade                     
 Total inventory                    Ferrotungsten                       
Tungsten metal powder, hydrogen reduced: 
Stockpile grade  Nonstockpile grade                   
Total inventory                     
Tungsten metal powder, carbon reduced: 
Stockpile grade  Nonstockpile grade                     
 Total inventory                     
Tungsten carbide powder: 
Stockpile grade                      Nonstockpile grade                 
 Totalinventory                     
 55,656 275,890 -- 36,947 
5,164 
566 
' 3,478 
978 
84,532 
38,491 
112,837 
5,730 
4,456 
123,023 
 -- 2,141 
2,141 
 1,200 1,276 - - 22 
- - 
- - 
- - 
1,276 
22 
 -- 1,298 
1,298 
 547 546 -- 171 
- - 
546 
171 
 - - 717 
- - 
- - 
717 
 1,900 841 -- 112 
- - 
1,080 
1,921 
112 
 -- 953 
1,080 
2,033 
' Includes 760,812 pounds of tungsten concentrate sold but unshipped. 
2 Includes 3,304,606 pounds of nonstockpile grade material credited to the
concentrate objective. Includes 174,433 pounds of nonstockpile grade material
credited to the concentrate objective. Includes 79,931 pounds of nonstockpile
grade hydrogen reduced metal powder credited to the subobjective. 
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
 Although domestic mine production in- was stockpiled as producers awaited
the creased 18% to almost 8.2 million pounds development of higher prices.
Although 37 of tungsten during the year, mine ship- mines in nine Western
States reported promerits increased only 3% and totaled 7.0 duction and 36
mines reported concentrate million pounds. Much tungsten concentrate shipments,
only two mines operated con- 


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