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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Sheridan, Eugene T.
Peat,   pp. 897-904 PDF (828.0 KB)


Page 903

Table 10.—Peat: World production, by country (Thousand short tons)
Country' 1970 1971 1972 ~ 
 Total r92,026 
Fuel peat included in total ' 58,811 
 89,610 89,338 
 55,994 55,869 
PEAT 
producer with 1.8 million short tons, provided about 2% of the world output.
Most of -the West German production was agricultural peat, but about one-fifth
was consumed as fuel. Other producers ran-king in output in 
the order named were the United States, 
90~ 
the Netherlands, Canada, and Finland. The combined output of these countries
was, however, only 2% of the total. Although fourth in world production,
output of the United States was only 0.7% of the world total. 
Argentina, agricultural use 
Canada,agriculturaluse________________________________ 
Denmark, fuel e 
Finland: 
Agricultural use 
Fuel______________________________________________ 
France, agricultural use 
Germany, West: 
Agriculturaluse 
Fuel______________________________________________ 
Hungary, agricultural use '  
Ireland: 
Agricultural use 
Fuel______________________________________________ 
Israel, agricultural use e 
Japan'                                                 
Korea, Republic of, agricultural use  
Netherlan& 
Norway: 
Agricultural use                                       
Fuel'                                              
Poland, fuel                                             
Spain                                             
Sweden: 
Agricultural use                                       
Fuel'                                              
U.S.S.R.: 
Agricultural use '  
Fuel                                               
United States, agricultural use                                
3 
r321 
6 
' 3 326 
6 
370 
6 
159 
97 
85 
259 
112 
' 90 
140 
166 
' 90 
rl,306 
~357 
72 
1,494 
 352 
72 
' 1,440 313 
72 
58 
' 5,908 
22 
80 
9 
440 
63 
6,058 
22 
80 
4 
440 
e70 
' 5,700 
22 
80 
' 4 
440 
12 
6 
55 
18 
' 12 
' 6 
' 55 
' 19 
' 12 
' 6 
' 55 
' 19 
' 113 
 23 
127 
23 
' 130 
 23 
r30,000 52,359 
517 
30,000 
49,382 
605 
30,000 
' 49,600 577 
 eEstimate. "Preliminary. ' Revised. 
 ' In addition to the countries listed, Austria Canada, Iceland, and Italy
produce a negligible quantity of fuel peat. No data are available for East
Germany, a major producer. 
TECHNOLOGY 
 Experimental work conducted at the University of Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada,2
indicated -that mercury present in waste water can -be removed and recovered
quantitatively by treatment with peat. The humic acids contained in peat
are known to be good ion-exchange resins, and the studies have shown that
contaminated waters can be made virtually mercury-free if treated with moss
peat in the presence of a precipitating agent such as sodium sulfide. Recovery
of mercury is accomplished by burning the peat containing mercury in the
presence of a limited amount of air. Vapors of mercury and sulfur dioxide
are eliminated in a scrubbing tower containing limestone and elemental sulfur,
and metal- 
lic mercury can be decanted from the water. 
 Field and laboratory studies conducted at the University of Minnesota 3
have shown that peat soil and various mixtures of sand, calcitic limestone,
and peat can be used as filter media to remove significant amounts of phosphorus
and organic materials from wastewaters. The treatment 
 2 Lalancette, J. M., and B. Coupal. Recovery of Mercury From Polluted Water
Through Peat Treatment. Proc. 4th Internat. Peat Cong., Otaniemi, Finland,
June 25—30, 1972, v. 4, pp. 
213—217. 
 Farnham, R. S., and J. L. Brown. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Using Organic
and Inorganic Materials. Proc. 4th Internat. Peat Cong., Otaniemi, Finland,
June 25—30, 1972, v. 4, pp. 
271—298. 


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