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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Sheridan, Eugene T.
Peat,   pp. 897-904 PDF (828.0 KB)


Page 899

Under 500 tons 
500 to 999 tons 
1,000 to4,999 tons 
5,000 to 14,999 tons________ 
15,000 to 24,999 tons 
Over25,000 tons___________ 
 29 24.1 5,868 1.0 26 25.2 6,142 1.0 
 17 14.2 11,649 1.9 11 10.7 7,678 1.3 
 44 36.7 93,949 15.5 38 36.9 86,279 15.0 
 20 16.7 182,622 30.2 18 17.5 170,153 29.5 
 4 3.3 67,388 11.1 6 5.8 111,240 19.3 
 6 5.0 243,906 40.3 4 3~9 195,220 33.9 
PEAT 
Table 4.—Relative size of peat operations in the United States 
899 
Active 
Size 
1971 
1972 
plants 
Production 
Active 
plants 
Production 
Number 
. 
% 
of total 
Short 
tons 
% 
of total 
Number 
% 
of total 
Short 
tons 
% 
cit total 
 Total 120 100.0 605,382 100.0 103 100.0 576,712 100.0 
 Active operations decreased from 120 to 103, but average output per plant
increased 11% to 5,599 tons. Three-fourths of the operations, however, had
outputs smaller than the average. Only 28 plants had production in excess
of 5,000 tons, and 
only four plants produced more than 25,000 tons. 
 Roughly one-third of the peat was sold as produced with no processing other
than air drying. Most of the remainder was shredded, and a small quantity
was subjected to thermal drying. 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 Commercial sales and imports both increased in 1972, and the amount of peat
available for consumption was about 2% 
greater than in 1971. 
 Peat was used for a variety of purposes, but 85% of the total commercial
sales reported by producers was for general soil improvement. Among the principal
markets for this peat were nurseries and greenhouses, which used peat as
a mulch and as a medium for growing plants and shrubs; landscape gardeners
and contractors, who used peat for building lawns and golf course greens
and for transplanting 
trees and shrubs; and garden, hardware, and variety stores, which sold peat
to homeowners for mulching and for improving lawn and garden soils. Most
of the remaining peat was sold for use in potting soils and for packing flowers
and shrubs, but small quantities were used in mushroom beds and in mixed
fertilizers and for earthworm culture and seed inoculant. 
 Fifty-four percent of the tonnage of peat sold commercially by producers
was packaged. Packaged peat, however, accounted for more than two-thirds
of the total value of sales. Of the total peat sold in packages, 
Table 5.—Commercial sales of peat in the United States in 1972, by
kind and use 1 
Use 
Moss 
Short tons Value (thousands) 
Reed-sedge 
Short tons Value (thousands) 
Humus 
Short tons Value (thousands) 
Bulk: 
Soil improvement             Other uses                   
Total                     
Packaged: 
Soilimprovement                
Otheruses                     
Total                     
Total: 
Soil improvement              Other uses                   
Grand total  
 56,882 $545 23,058 121 
75,764 
37,096 
$688 
346 
65,400 
18,335 
$433 
130 
 79,940 665 
112,860 
1,035 
83,735 
563 
 84,467 1,613 2,423 66 
212,765 
4,821 
2,375 
69 
23,305 
2,363 
508 
217 
 86,890 1,678 
217,586 
2,444 
25,668 
725 
 141,349 2,158 25,481 187 
288,528 
41,917 
3,063 
415 
88,705 
20,698 
941 
347 
 166,830 2,344 
330,446 
3,479 
109,403 
1,289 
' Data may not add to totals shown bee 
ause of independent rounding. 


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