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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

DeHuff, Gilbert L.
Manganese,   pp. 757-769 ff. PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 759

 MANGANESE 759 
Table 8.—Consumption and industry stocks of manganese ore' in the United
States 
(Short tons) 
Consumption 
Stocks 
Dec. 31, 
1972 
1971 
1972 
By use: 
 Manganesealloys and metal 1,837,683. 1,925,715 
 Pig iron and steel 187,251 211,157 
 Dry cells, chemicals and miscellaneous 130,520 194,587 
 1,382,747 
 131,580 
 280,460 
 Total 2,155,454 2,331,459 1,794,787 
By origin: 
 Domestic 28,316 39,628 
 Foreign 2,127,138 2,291,831 
11,846 
1,782,941 
    Total 2,155,454 2,331,459 1,794,787 
 1 Containing 35 percent or more manganese (natural). 
Table 4.—Consumption, by end use, and industry stocks of manganese
ferroalloys 
and metal in the United States, in 1972 
(Short tons, gross weight) 
End use 
 Ferromanganese 
~— 
 High Medium 
 carbon and low 
Silico- 
manganese 
Spiegel- 
eisen 
Manganese 
metal 1 
carbon 
Steel: 
Carbon                            
Stainless and heat resisting               
Full alloy                           
High-strength low-alloy                 
Electric                             
659,872 
 4,197 
76,729 
59,445 
326 
99,424 
5,292 
26,496 
8,254 
 204 
71,067 
8,371 
26,682 
6,544 
 817 
9,871 
- - 
1,141 
 141 
 ~ 
7,078 
6,483 
1,216 
 375 
8 
Tool                               
Castirons                              
Superalloys                                 
Alloys (excludes alloy steels and superalloys)      
Miscellaneous and unspecified                
 Total                            Stocks December31                     
1,175 
16,231 
 220 
4,608 
 989 
 222 
1,986 
 90 
1,180 
1,028 
 27 
3,660 
 W 
2,393 
4692 
8,461 
4 
2 
 676 
23 
 338 
12,685 
1,067 
823,792 
368,214 
144,176 
36,292 
124,253 
54,024 
19,620 
13,217 
29,949 
6,704 
 W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included
in "Miscellaneous and unspecified." 
 1 Virtually all electrolytic. 
three companies: Foote Mineral Co., New 
Johnsonville, Tenn.; Kerr-McGee Chemical 
Corp., Hamilton, (Aberdeen), Miss.; and 
Union Carbide Corp., Marietta, Ohio. 
 Ferromanganese.—Bethlehem Steel Co. and U.S. Steel Corp. continued
to be the only domestic ferromanganese producers using blast furnaces: Bethlehem
at Johnstown, Pa.; U.S. Steel in the Pittsburgh district at Clairton and
McKeesport, Pa. Electric furnaces were used to produce ferromanganese by
the same 6 companies in the same 10 plants as in 1971: Airco Alloys and Carbide
Div., Airco, Inc., Calvert City, Ky., and Theodore (Mobile), Ala.; Chromium
Mining & Smelting Corp., Woodstock (Memphis), Tenn.; Ohio Feero-Alloys
Corp., Philo, Ohio; Roane Electric Furnace Division of Woodward Corp., a
Division of Mead Corp., Rockwood, Tenn.; Tenn-Tex Alloy Corporation of 
Houston, Houston, Tex.; and Union Carbide Corp., Ferroalloys Div., Alloy,
W. Va., Ashtabula and Marietta, Ohio, and Portland, Oreg. Fused salt electrolysis
continued to be used by Chemetals Division, Diamond Shamrock Chemical Co.,
Kingwood, W. Va., to make low-carbon ferromanganese sold under the trade
name of Massive Manganese. US. shipments of *ferromanganese totaled 727,000
short tons, compared with 800,000 tons in 1971. 
 Siicomanganese.—Production of silicomanganese in the United States
was 153,000 short tons, compared with 165,000 tons in 1971. Shipments from
furnaces totaled 
146,000 tons, compared with 144,000 tons in 1971. In l~72, 7 companies utilized
11 plants to make siiicomanganese: Airco Alloys and Carbide Div., Airco,
Inc., Calvert City, Ky., and Theodore (Mobile), Ala.; Chromium Mining &
Smelting Corp., 


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