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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Stipp, Henry E.
Iron oxide pigments,   pp. 683-687 ff. PDF (463.3 KB)


Page 684

684 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 Consumption of iron oxide pigments increased sharply in 1972 as the result
of high levels of paint, lacquer, and varnish sales. Record high construction
' activity for the second consecutive year and increased sales of automobiles,
appliances and furniture reportedly were responsible for the increased consumption
of paint, lacquer, and varnish. Shortages of some grades of iron oxide pigments
occurred as a result of overall economic expansion, dollar devaluation, and
price controls. Domestic supplies of yellow iron oxide were inadequate and
imports were curtailed by decreased shipments from abroad. Foreign producers
preferred to sell their products overseas where they could obtain a higher
price. Several new paint formulas were introduced that incorporated yellow
iron oxide and yellow organic pigments as a replacement for yellow lead chromate.
Inventories depleted in the last quarter of 1971 were being replaced during
most of 1972, however increased consumption slowed inventory rebuilding.
Micaceous iron oxide, imported 
from Austria, was gaining increasing acceptance as a primer for protection
of iron and steel structures against corrosion. A new group of red and yellow
synthetic iron oxides became available for use in automobile finishes, aluminum
coatings, and stains. 
 Iron oxide pigments were used in paints, rubber, plastics, concrete products,
paper, magnetic ink, fertilizers, and animal ' food. They were used also
in ferrite applications such as television components, filters in radio equipment,
computer memory cores, door latches and seals, small electric motors, and
inductor and microwave devices. Iron oxide material was used in miscellaneous
applications such as abrasives, welding rod coatings, soil conditioners,
foundry sands, and automobile brake linings. 
 Data are not collected by the Bureau of Mines on specific uses for iron
oxide pigments, and the figures given in table 2 do not necessarily reflect
all sales of iron oxide pigment material for uses other than pigments. 
Table 2.—Finished iron oxide pigments sold by processors in the United
States, by kind 
- 
Pigment 
1971 
Quantity Value (short tons) (thousands) 
1972 
Quantity 
(short tons) 
Value 
(thousands) 
Natural: 
Brewn: 
Iron oxide (metallic) 1                 
Umbers: 
13,453 
$2, 109 
19,074 
$3,467 
Burnt                           Raw                             
4,441 
1,196 
1,136 
309 
5,376 
1,541 
1,441 
435 
Red: 
Iron oxide                         
 Sienna, burnt                       
 Pyrite cinder                       
Yellow: 
27,518 
903 
(2) 
1,938 
401 
(2) 
35,541 
1,201 
(2) 
2,547 
531 
(2) 
Ocher'                            
Sienna, raw                        
Total natural                      
Manufactured: 
10,181 
787 
2,088 
277 
6,223 
992 
495 
389 
58,479 
8,258 
69,948 
9,305 
Black: Magnetic                        
Brown: Iron oxide                       
Red: 
3,692 
6,272 
2,384 
2,284 
3,149 
6,539 
1,376 
2,748 
Pure red iron oxides: 
Calcinedcopperas                 
 Otherchemicalprocesses           Venetian red                        
20,540 
11,492 
467 
6,696 
2,861 
106 
19,185 
14,426 
505 
6,499 
4,531 
135 
Yellow: Iron oxide                       
22,469 
7,643 
31,867 
11,118 
 Total manufactured                   Unspecified including mixtures of natural
and manufactured red iron oxides                     
64,932 
4,897 
21,974 
1,105 
75,671 
28,773 
26,407 
4,618 
Grand total                          
128,308 
31,337 
174,392 
40,330 
' Includes black magnetite and Vandyke brown. 
2 Pyrite cinder included with red iron oxide for 1971 and 1972. 
 Includes yellow iron oxide. 


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