University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Ecology and Natural Resources Collection

Page View

Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Clarke, Robert G.
Gem stones,   pp. 559-565 ff. PDF (763.6 KB)


Page 560

560 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
CONSUMPTION 
 Domestic gem stone output generally went to rock, mineral, and gem stone
collections, objects of art, and jewelry. Apparent consumption of gem stones
(domes- 
tic production plus imports minus exports and reexports) increased to $423
million, compared with $311 million in 1971, because of greater imports of
diamond. 
PRICES 
 During 1972, representative price ranges for first-quality, cut and polished,
unmounted gem diamond were 0.25 carat, $100 to $400; 0.5 carat, $300 to $1,000;
1 carat, $700 to $3,500; 2 carats, $2,000 to 
$11,500; and 3 carats, $3,500 to $25,000. The median price for each range
was 0.25 carat, $200; 0.5 carat, $550; 1 carat, $1,675; 2 carats, $4,500;
and 3 carats, $9,000. 
FOREIGN TRADE 
 Exports of all gem materials amounted to $184.9 million, and reexports,
to $110.9 million. Diamond was 93% of the value of exports and 92% of the
value of reexports. U.S. exports of diamond in 1972, on which work was done
prior to reexport, amounted to 371,381 carats valued at $172.3 million. Of
this, diamond, rough or uncut, suitable for gem stones, not classified by
weight, was 345 carats valued at $18,975; cut but unset, not over 0.5 carat,
was 63,780 carats valued at $11.5 million; and cut but unset, over 0.5 carat,
was 307,256 carats valued at $160.8 million. 
 Reexports of diamond, on which no work was done, amounted to 1,430,244 carats
valued at $101.9 million in categories as follows: Rough or uncut, suitable
for gem stones, not classified by weight, 1,335,606 carats valued at $79.0
million; cut but unset, not over 0.5 carat, 40,384 carats valued at $7.7
million; cut but unset, over 0.5 carat, 54,254 carats valued at $15.2 million.
 The six leading recipients of diamond exports and reexports accounted for
94% of the carats and 86% of the value and were as follows: Israel, 609,121
carats valued at $41.0 million; Belgium, 435,075 carats valued at $28.5 million;
Switzerland, 203,209 carats valued at $37.7 million; Netherlands, 177,003
carats valued at $40.0 million; Japan, 154,497 carats valued at $34.7 million;
and Hong Kong, 112,124 carats valued at $71.1 million. 
 Exports of all other gem materials amounted to $12.6 million. Of this total,
pearls, natural and cultured, not set or strung, were valued at $0.2 million.
Natu 
ral precious and semiprecious stones, unset, were valued at $9.7 million;
synthetic or reconstructed stones, unset, were valued at $2.7 million. Reexports
of all other gem 
materials amounted to $9.0 million. Reexports of pearls amounted to $0.3
million; of natural precious and semiprecious stones, unset, to $8.5 million;
and of synthetic or reconstructed stones, unset, to $0.2 million. 
 Imports of gem material increased 36% in value compared with that of 1971.
Diamond accounted for 88% of the total value of gem stone imports. 
 The four leading suppliers of diamond imports were as follows: United Kingdom,
1,334,000 carats valued at $182.2 million; Belgium-Luxembourg, 1,275,000
carats valued at $158.1 million; Republic of South Africa, 980,000 carats
valued at $108.3 million; and Israel, 890,000 carats valued at $103.4 million.
 Imports of emeralds increased 63% in quantity and 187% in value. Of 30 countries
supplying natural emeralds to the United States, India furnished 276,198
carats valued at $6.2 million; Brazil, 90,483 carats valued at $1.5 million;
and Colombia, 26,635 carats valued at $7.2 million. Also furnishing emeralds
to the United States, but for which the country of origin was unknown, were
Switzerland, 31,266 carats valued at $2.3 million; Hong Kong, 52,905 carats
valued at $1.4 million; United Kingdom, 31,634 carats valued at $1.2 million;
and France, 4,979 carats valued at $1.0 million. These seven countries furnished
90% of the quantity (in carats) 


Go up to Top of Page