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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Ampian, Sarkis G.
Clays,   pp. 301-327 ff. PDF (2.9 MB)


Page 307

CLAYS 
Table 10.—Ball clay sold or used by producers in the United States,
by State 
 1971 1972 
State Short tons Value Short tons Value - 
Tennessee 377,421 $5,455,628 431,126 $6,444,986 
OtherStates' 225,203 4,156,589 244,159 4,350,539 
 Total 602,624 9,612,217 675,285 10,795,525 
 ' Includes California, Indiana (1972), Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi,
New Jersey (1971), New York, and Texas. 
 1971 1972 
State 
 Short tons Value Short tons Value 
Total 3,044,231 19,004,822 3,580,635 29,184,933 
W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included
with "Other States." 
 1 Refractory uses only. 
 ' Includes Arizona (1972), Georgia, Iowa (1971), Montana, New Mexico, North
Carolina (1971), South Carolina (1971), Washington, West Virginia, and data
included by symbol W. 
to $15.99 per ton, an increase of $0.04 per ton. Chemical Marketing Reporter,
December 25, 1972, listed ball clay prices as -follows: 
Domestic, air-floated, bags, carload lots, Tennessee, per ton        $18.
00—$22 .00 
Domestic, crushed, moisture—repelllent, bulk, carload lots, Tennessee,
 per ton 8.00—11.25 
Imported, air-floated, bags, carload 
 lots, Atlantic ports, per ton 70.00 
Imported, lump, bulk, Great Lakes, 
 per ton 40.50 
307 
 Ball clay exports in 1972 amounted to 87,000 short tons valued at $1.7 million,
compared with 77,000 tons worth $1.5 million in 1971. Exports increased 13%
over that shipped in 1971, while the value was 12% higher. The unit value
of ball clay exported in 1972 declined $0.11 per ton, from $19.55 in 1971
to $19.44. These shipments were made to 21 countries. The major recipients
were Canada, 48%, and Mexico, 44%; 19 countries accounted for the remaining
8%. 
FIRE CLAY 
 Fire clay sold or used by domestic producers in 1972 was reported at 3,580,635
short tons valued at $29.2 million. Fire clay is defined as detrital material,
either plastic or rocklike, containing low percentages of iron oxide, lime,
magnesia, and alkalies to enable the material to withstand temperatures of
1,500° C or higher. Fire clay is basically kaolinite but usually contains
other materials such as diaspore, ball clay, bauxite clay, and shale. Fire
clays commonly occur as underclay below coal 
seams and are generally used for refractories. Some fire clay was -previously
reported in other end uses. 
 Fire clay production was reported in 1972 from mines in 21 States. The first
four States in rank, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Alabama, accounted
for 79% of the total domestic output. 
 In 1972 Louisville Fire Brick Works increased capacity for special hand-molded
firebrick shapes at its Grahn, Ky., plant. 
 Exports of fire clay decreased from 162,000 short tons worth $3.6 million
in 
1971 to 124,000 tons valued at $2.9 million 
Table 11.—Fire day sold or used by producers in the United States,
by State 1 
Alabama 
California                             
Colorado 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Kentucky 
Maryland 
Missouri 
New Jersey___________________________ 
Ohio 
Pennsylvania 
Tennessee 
Texas 
Utah 
Other States' 
 299,954 $2,736,448 350,094 $2,862,973 
 36,559 121,520 100,270 281,387 
 42,512 242,084 54,294 206,158 
 W W 9,868 W 
 89,725 513,504 106,003 661,752 
 W 4,466 W W 
 112,884 533,311 81,094 517,775 
 -- -- 3,319 11,617 
 871,631 4,895,960 894,174 5,512,204 
 W W 59,372 370,757 
 658,229 3,567,757 803,493 5,127,052 
 559,128 4,172,685 768,688 9,809,806 
 23 46 21 42 
 74,814 W 88,821 684,400 
 W W 3,764 21,790 
 298,772 2,217,041 257,360 3,117,220 


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