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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Brown, Brinton C.
Cement,   pp. 247-287 ff. PDF (4.5 MB)


Page 252

DOMESTIC PRODUCTION 
Daily clinker capacity, 
December 
31 
Number 
Total 
Percent 
Short tons per 24-hour period 
of plants' 
Kilns' 
capacity 
of total 
capacity 
1971: 
Less than 600                             
600 to 1,150                               
1,150 to 1,700                          
1,700 to 2,300                          
2,300 to 2,800                             
2,800 and over                             
 Total                                 1972: 
6 
49 
65 
28 
11 
11 
10 
98 
170 
95 
37 
56 
2,671 
40,455 
88,927 
54,303 
28,734 
41,772 
1.0 
15.8 
34.6 
21.1 
11.2 
16.3 
170 
466 
256,862 
100.0 
Less than 600                             
600tol,150                               
1,150 to 1,700                          
1,700 to 2,300                             
2,300 to 2,800                             
2,800 and over  
10 
47 
60 
29 
9 
14 
17 
93 
175 
78 
31 
68 
4,860 
40,646 
80,808 
55,384 
22,646 
52,073 
1.9 
15.9 
31.5 
21.6 
8.8 
20.3 
Total                                  
169 
461 
256,417 
100.0 
 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972' Includes white-cement-producing facilities.Total
number in operation at plants.252 
ment was installed or under construction by the following companies with
dollar values in millions, if announced: American Cement Corp. at Detroit,
Mich. (3.1); Colonial Sand and Stone Co. at Kingston, N.Y. (2.5); Gifford-Hill
& Co. Inc. at Midlothian, Tex., and Harleyville, S.C. (3.5); Kaiser Cement
& Gypsum Co. at Waianae, Hawaii (0.4); Lehigh Portland Cement Co. at
Alsen, N.Y. (4.0), and Mason City, Iowa (2.0); Louisville Cement Co. at three
PORTLAND CEMENT 
 Manufacturers in the United States and Puerto Rico produced 77,378,000 tons
of clinker and imported 1,691,000 tons of foreign clinker to grind an alltime
record 80,744,000 tons of portland cement. Domestic producers shipped 8-1,432,000
tons of portland cement which included 1,512,000 tons of imported cement.
Stocks increased about 600,000 tons. In addition to the imported cement shipped
by domestic manufacturers, 1.6 -million tons of portland cement was imported
and shipped or used by others not producing cement in the United States and
Puerto Rico. 
 Production Capacity.—Four new kilns were brought into production with
a combined annual capacity of 1.5 million tons, and five old kilns were reactivated
at four plants in 1972. However, 13 old kilns were permanently removed from
production at four plants by yearend and the total annual production capacity
remained vir 
plants (44); Marquette Cement Manufacturing Co. at several plants (6.7);
Medusa Corp. at Clinchfield, Ga. (3.9); Huron Portland Cement Div. of National
Gypsum Co. at Alpena, Mich. (2.5); OKC Corp. at Pryor, Okia., and New -Orleans,
La.; Univernal Atlas Cement Div. of United States Steel Corp. at Hannibal,
Mo., Waco, Tex., and Independence, Kans.; and Wyandotte Cement, Inc., at
its grindi-ng plant in Wyandotte, Mich. (0.75). 
tually the same as in 1971. 
 At yearend 461 kilns were in operation at 169 plants in 41 States and Puerto
Rico with an estimated 24-hour-daily clinker production capacity of 256,000
tons. An average of 31 days downtime was reported for kiln maintenance and
replacing refractory bricks, so based on 3-34 days of operation, the apparent
annual clinker production capacity of the industry was 85.4 million tons.
 In addition to 169 clinker-producing plants, including eight white cement
facilities, six plants operated grinding mills only, on imported, purchased,
or interplant transfers of clinker. Information was not collected on grinding
capacity, but the total in the United States and Puerto Rico was estimated
to be 94 million tons. 
 The following tabulation sho-ws the daily clinker production capacities
of cement plants in the United States and Puerto Rico, grouped according
to relative size: 


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