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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Metals, minerals, and fuels 1972
Year 1972, Volume 1 (1972)

Fulkerson, Frank B.
Barite,   pp. 181-187 ff. PDF (537.9 KB)


Page 182

182 MINERALS YEARBOOK, 1972 
vada; Milchem, Inc., with four mines in Missouri and four in Nevada; Baroid
Div., NL Industries, Inc., with two mines in Missouri, one in Arkansas, one
in Nevada, and one in Tennessee; and Inlet Oil Corp., with a mine in Alaska.
 Ground and crushed barite was produced mainly in Arkansas, Missouri, and
Nevada from domestic barite and in Loinsiana and Texas from imported material.
Processing plants were also located in Alaska, California, Georgia, Illinois,
Tennessee, and Utah. 
 Dresser Minerals was constructing a new beneficiation plant at its Greystone
mine, 
southeast of Battle Mountain, Nev. The 
-new plant was scheduled for completion in 
1973. 
 The Missouri Geological Survey testdrilled four tailings ponds i-n the Washington
County bärite district to determine the quantity and size-grade distribution
of the barite contained in them. Interest in the ponds was increasing as
k-nown barite reserves were progressively being depleted. A district inventory
-indicated a total of 67 ponds containing an estimated 1.9 million tons of
barite. This was equivalent to nearly 10 years' supply at the current production
rate.2 
CONSUMPTION AND USES 
 About 80% of the ground and crushed barite sold was used as a weighting
agent in oil- and gas-well drilling muds; this use increased 139,000 tons.
Barite usage for barium-chemical manufacturing decreased 35,000 tons. All
other uses increased 18,000 tons. 
 Producers of barium chemicals from barite included Chemetron Corp., Huntington,
W. Va.; Chemical Products Corp., Cartersville, Ga.; Great Western Sugar Co.,
Johnstown, Cob.; Inorganic Chemicals Div., FMC Corp., Modesto, Calif.; Mallinckrodt
Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo.; PPG I-n- 
2 Wharton, H. M. Barite Ore Potential of Four 
Tailings Ponds in the Washington County Barite 
District, Missouri. Missouri Geol. Survey and 
Water Res. Rept. of Inv. 53, Rolla, Mo., 1972, 
91 pp. 
Table 3.—Ground and crushed barite sold, by use' 
Use2 
1970 
Short tons % o 
f total 
1971 
Short tons ¶37 
,~ of total 
1972 
Short tons % of total 
Barium chemicals'          
Glass                   
Filler or extender: 
Paint                  
 Rubber                
 Other filler              Well drilling                 Other uses     
Total                  
146,038 
49,642 
43,919 
 25,489 
(4) 
1,118,973 
24,565 
10 
4 
3 
2 
- - 
79 
2 
140,843 
(4) 
 43,439 
(4) 
 22,430 
1,044,367 
104,318 
10 
- - 
3 
- - 
2 
77 
8 
 105,589 7 
 (4) - - 
 46,342 3 
 (4) - - (4) - - 
 1,183,340 80 142,183 10 
1,408,626 
100 
1,355,397 
100 
 1,477,454 100 
' Includes imported barite. 
' Uses reported by producers of ground and crushed barite, except for barium
chemicals. ' Quantities reported by consumers. 
' Included with "Other uses" to avoid disclosing individual company confidential
data. 
Table 4.—Barium chemicals produced and sold by producers in the United
States in 1972 1 
(Short tons) 
Chemical 
Plants 
Produced 
Sold by Quantity 
producers 
Value 
Barium carbonate                                     
5 44,611 
35,569 
$5,247,301 
Other barium chemicals2                          
(3) 
* 38,880 
30,576 
- 8,621,979 
Total4                                
7 
83,491 
66,145 
13,869,280 
' Only data reported by barium-chemical plants that consume barite are included.
 ' Includes black ash, blanc fixe, chloride, hydroxide, oxide, peroxide,
sulfide, and other compounds for which separate data may not be revealed.
' Black ash, 1 plant; blanc fixe, 2; chloride, 3; oxide, 1; peroxide, 1;
and sulfIde, 1. 
A plant producing more than 1 product is counted only once in arriving at
total. 


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