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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1972
Year 1972, Volume 2 (1972)

Brown, Brinton C.
Iowa,   pp. 269-284 PDF (1.5 MB)


Page 269

  269The Mineral Industry of Iowa 
This chapter has been prepared under a cooperative agreement between the
Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Geological Survey
of Iowa for collecting infonnation on all minerals except fuels. 
By Brinton C. row' 
 Iowa ranked 31st in the United States in the value of its mineral production
which reached another ailtime high of S134,496,000 in 1972, surpassing last
year's record by 5%. Increased output of nonmetallic minerals, with the exception
of lime and sand and gravel, combined with higher prices, more than offset
decreased production and value of coal and peat. 
 Nonmetallic minerals dominated the State's mineral production, with 97%
of the total value; the remaining 3% was mineral fuels comprising mostly
coal. Mineral production value in the State was divided as follows: Portland
cement, 37%; stone, 36%; sand and gravel, 15%; gypsum, 4%; coal, 3%; clays,
2%; masonry cement, 1%; and the remaining 2% lime, peat, and gem stones.
Although petroleum has not been produced since 1963, this was the second
year in which no applications were made 
for permits for oil tests. However, 161 drilling permits were issued during
1972: 24 for gas injection/withdrawal wells, three for observation wells
associated with Iowa's five gas storage projects, and 134 for stratigraphic
tests. 
 Natural gas deliveries were curtailed to "interruptible" customers during
cold weather, which led to a run on alternate fuels 
—oil and propane. These fuels were also in short supply nationwide
and an acute shortage developed that was responsible for closing some mineral
processing plants during the winter. Farmers also had difficulty obtaining
fuel for drying a huge corn crop before storage. 
 Legislation and Government Programs.— The following Federal legislation
enacted during 1972 can affect mineral producing 
 Mining engineer, Division of Nonmetallic Minerals—Mineral Supply.
Table 1.—Mineral production in Iowa' 
1971 
1972 
Quantity Value 
Quantity 
Value 
Mineral 
(thousands) 
(thousands) 
Cement: Portland thousand short tons__ 
 Masonry do~.,..Clays  do..., 
2,393 
66 
2 1,028 
989 
W 
1,154 
18,279 
25,389 
$47,925 
1,719 
2 1,702 
4,609 
W 
4,460 
20,530 
44,977 
2,458 
66 
1,047 
851 
NA 
1,380 
17,107 
27,457 
$49,635 
1,916 
2,643 
4,138 
1 
5,714 
20,140 
48,642 
Coal (bituminous) do..._Gem stones                         Gypsum thousand
short ton&...Sand and gravel do..,~....Stone do.._.. 
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: 
Clay (fire) (1971), lime, peat, stone (dimension) (1971), and values indicated
by symbol W Total 
XX 
1,899 
XX 
1,667 
XX 
XX 
127,821 
108,686 
XX 
XX 
134,496 P 111,887 
Total 1967 constant dollars              
P Preliminary. NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing individual
company confidential data; included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."
XX Not applicable. 
1P~uction as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
2 fire clay; included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed." 
Excludes certain dimension stone; included with "Value of items that cannot
be disclosed," 


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