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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

Aase, James H.; West, Wanda J.; Brostuen, Erling A.
North Dakota,   pp. 407-412 PDF (589.0 KB)


Page 407

  407The Mineral Industry of 
North Dakota 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the 
Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the North Dakota Geological
Survey for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals. 
By James H. Aase,' Wanda J. West,2 and Erling A. Brostuen~ 
The value of nonfuel mineral production in North Dakota for 1978 and 1979
was $22.1 million and $21.2 million, respectively. Sand and gravel continued
as the State's leading nonfuel mineral commodity, accounting for more than
70% of the total output value in 1978 and 1979. Other nonfuel mineral commodities
produced in the State during the biennium, in descending order of their production
value, included salt, lime, clays, peat, and gem stones. 
Nationally, North Dakota ranked in the lowest 10 percentile group of States
for production values derived from nonfuel minerals in 1978-79. 
On the average, approximately 65 firms and various governmental agencies,
operating out of fewer than 100 locations, have accounted for nearly all
of the State's nonfuel mineral production in recent years. 
A severe cement shortage that plagued much of the North-Central United States
during 1978 was also evident in North Dakota. The State relies exclusively
on outof-State supplies and experienced a cutback in shipments from its traditional
suppliers, who were unable to meet all of North Dakota's needs. State officials,
concerned that the shortage would continue, instigated a study to determine
the availability of cement manufacturing resources within the State and the
economic feasibility of establishing a cement industry. Results of the study
released at yearend 1978 concluded that the undertaking was not economically
feasible under existing conditions because of inadequate supplies of suitable
raw materials and an in-State market too small to warrant production. 
Table 1.—Nonfuel mineral production in North Dakota' 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Mineral 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
Value 
(thousands) 
Quantity 
 Value (thousands) 
Gemstones                    
Peat thousand short tons. - 
Sand and gravel do... — — — 
Combined value of clays, lime, salt, and values indicated by symbol W   
 Total                      
NA 
(2) 
5,821 
XX 
 $2 
 W 
12,102 
4,672 
NA W 
7,407 
XX 
 $1 
 W 
17,170 
4,966 
NA 
(2) 
6,648 
XX 
 $1 
 W 
15,128 
6,105 
XX 
16,776 
XX 
22,137 
XX 
21,234 
 NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data;
value included in "Combined value" figure. XX Not applicable. 
 ' Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
 2Less than 1/2 unit. 


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